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Most often, a special character suffers lethal damage, which causes him to lose either vitality points or wound points. Standard characters, animals, and gear make Damage saves instead, as explain in a separate section below.

vITAlITy POInTS

A character’s class levels and Constitution modifier determine his vitality points. Vitality points are a mixture of endurance and luck, representing a character’s ability to avoid injury. Losing vitality points does not represent actual physical damage but rather combat fatigue, as it gradually becomes more difficult for the character to avoid being physically injured. As a character’s vitality points drop, he’s edging closer to exhaustion and the possibility of a nasty wound.

wOund POInTS

A character’s wound points are usually equal to his Constitution score. Wound points represent a character’s ability to sustain injury. As a character’s wound points drop, he acquires abrasions, cuts, and eventually broken bones and worse.

vITAlITy vS. wOundS

Players may envision their characters shrugging off countless bullet wounds, broken bones, and other injuries in Spycraft 2.0. After all, every hit must indicate some physical damage, right?

Not exactly.

The vitality/wound system is intended to simulate the flow of a TV show or movie, in which the heroes dive through endless showers of lead before they suffer a single serious hit in the final segment. Likewise, a character’s vitality points represent all the near misses he can wade through before he starts to suffer real injuries. When a character loses wound points — that’s when the blood starts flowing.

APPlyInG dAMAGE

Unless otherwise specified, when a special character suffers a standard hit, the damage is subtracted from his vitality points. When he suffers a critical hit, the damage is subtracted from his wound points.

A special character suffers no ill effects from damage until and unless one of the following circumstances occurs.

  • When his vitality points are reduced to 0, he becomes fatigued (see page 341). Further, when a character possesses no vitality points, all damage is applied directly to his wound points.
  • Each time he loses 1 or more wound points for any reason, he becomes fatigued (see page 341).
  • When his wound points are reduced to 0, he falls unconscious (see page 342).
  • When his wound points are reduced to –1 or lower, he falls unconscious and begins dying (see page 341).
  • When his wound points drop to –10 or lower, he is dead (see page 340).
  • When his wound points drop to –25 or lower, his body is destroyed (see page 340).
  • When he suffers 25–49 points of damage in a single hit, he must make a Fortitude save (DC 1/2 the damage suffered, rounded down). With failure, he rolls 1d20 and adds the damage suffered, and then consults Table: The Table of Ouch to find his critical injury.
  • When he suffers 50 or more points of damage in a single hit (of any type), he must make a Fortitude save (DC equal to 1/2 the damage suffered (rounded down)). With failure, he rolls 1d20 and adds the damage suffered, and then consults Table: The Table of Ouch to find his critical injury. Additionally, his wound points are reduced to –9, at which point he begins or continues to die as described earlier in this section.

nPC dAMAGE SAvES

Standard NPCs are intended to be “easy kill” mooks and other supportng characters, and suffer damage differently than special NPCs. Each standard NPC and animal possesses a Damage save bonus. Each time a standard NPC or animal suffers 1 or more points of damage, the NPC makes a Damage save against a DC equal to 10 + 1/2 the damage suffered (rounded down). A Damage save has no error or threat range.

Example: A minion has a Damage save bonus of +10. When the minion suffers 8 points of lethal damage, he must make a Damage save against a DC of 14, which means he must roll a 4 or higher to succeed.

A few conditional rules apply, as follows.

  • If the damage inflicted possesses the armor-piercing quality, the NPC’s Damage save bonus decreases by the same amount before the Damage save is made (e.g. if the damage inflicted possesses the AP (4) quality, a Damage save bonus of +9 becomes +5).
  • If the damage inflicted has a blast increment (see page 343), the NPC fails 1 additional Damage save per 10 full points by which the save is failed (e.g. if the save DC is 34 and the save result is 16, the NPC fails 2 saves).
  • With a critical hit, the NPC automatically fails 1 Damage save per Action Die spent to activate the critical hit — in addition to the saves the NPC typically fails (e.g. if an NPC suffers a critical hit from a rocket launcher, fails his save by 22, and the attacker spends 2 Action Dice to activate the hit, the NPC fails a total of 5 saves).

When an NPC’s Damage save is successful, he may suffer nicks and scratches but the attack has no mechanical effect. The damage lingers, however, and is cumulative with each subsequent injury until the NPC fails a Damage save or until the end of the current scene, whichever comes first.

Example: Following the previous example, a minion suffers an additional 9 points of lethal damage. He must make another Damage save with a DC of 18 (10 + (17 divided by 2, rounded down)). When an NPC’s Damage save fails, he suffers one of the following effects, as appropriate.

  • If the NPC’s most recent injury inflicted subdual or stress damage, he falls unconscious, waking up at a point determined by the GC.
  • If the NPC’s most recent injury inflicted lethal damage, he dies.

NPCs and animals with the tough quality must fail 2 or more Damage saves before these effects occur (see page 451).

Finally, some additional rules apply to NPC Damage saves, as described on page 452.

dAMAGE REduCTIOn

Certain gear and abilities — including some animals’ hides — grant “damage reduction,” which allows a target to ignore some or all damage from each hit. Damage reduction differs from damage resistance in that it affects all damage types equally (with some infrequent exceptions, described later in this section). When a target possessing 1 or more points of damage reduction suffers lethal damage, his damage reduction decreases the damage before it’s applied.

Example: Kevin wears a tuxedo liner, which grants 2 points of damage reduction against melee attacks. He is hit with a melee attack and suffers 12 points of damage, but only 10 are applied. Unless otherwise stated, whenever damage reduction reduces a damage total to 0, it also negates any special effects that accompany the damage.

Example: Kevin is hit with a poisoned knife, but his armor’s damage reduction reduces the attack’s damage to 0. Kevin brushes off not only the damage, but also the effects of the poison. Damage reduction has the same effect on damage from standard and critical hits.

Damage reduction is commonly abbreviated as “DR X/Y,” where “X” is the amount of damage reduction the character possesses against lethal damage inflicted by any attack and “Y” is a list of circumstances under which the damage reduction is negated. An entry of “—“ indicates that no special circumstances negate the damage reduction; for instance, a character with armor granting g “DR 2/—“ has two points of damage reduction against lethal damage that no circumstances negate.

When damage possesses the armor-piercing quality, the target’s DR temporarily decreases by the number listed in parentheses after the quality tag (see page 301). The DR returns to its previous value immediately after the armor-piercing damage is applied.

BRuISInG

Whenever DR reduces the damage from any one source of injury to 0 or less, the character suffers 1 point of subdual damage. For more information about subdual damage, see page 339.

Table: The Table of Ouch
ResultCritical InjurySurgery Check DCHealing Time*
Up to 35 Bleeding† 20 1 scene**
36–40 Broken limb (lose use of arm or Speed reduced by 20 ft.)†† 20 1d4 missions
41–45 Internal rupture (permanent –2 to highest of Str, Dex, or Con)†† 25 1d4 missions
46–50 Maimed limb (lose use of arm or Speed reduced by 20 ft.)†† 30 1d6 missions
51–55 Brain damage (permanent –2 to highest of Int, Wis, or Cha)†† 35 1d4 missions
56–60 Massive system trauma (permanently sickened) 40 1d4 missions
61–65 Nerve damage (permanently nauseated) 45 1d3 missions
66–70 Spinal injury (permanently paralyzed) 50 1 mission∆
* The character heals 1 increment before the start of each mission and for each full month of downtime. When an increment reaches 0, the critical injury heals naturally. The critical injury’s healing time may decrease by 2 with a Medicine/Surgery check at the listed DC.
** This forgiving critical injury heals at the end of the current scene.
† The character suffers 1d8 stress damage whenever he gains this critical injury.
†† With a broken or maimed limb, the GC determines the limb affected. With an internal rupture or brain damage, the GC randomly determines which attribute is affected in the case of a tie.
∆ The character is assumed to receive surgery after the current mission.

dAMAGE RESISTAnCE

Certain gear and abilities — including some animals’ hides — grant “damage resistance,” which allows a target to ignore some or all of a certain type of damage. Damage resistance differs from damage reduction in that it affects only one damage type at a time.

When a target possessing 1 or more points of damage resistance suffers the designated type of damage other than lethal (e.g. cold, collision, etc.), his damage resistance decreases the damage before it’s applied.

Example: A polar bear has 2 points of cold resistance. It is hit and suffers 12 points of cold damage, but only 10 are applied. Unless otherwise stated, whenever damage resistance reduces a damage total to 0, it also negates any special effects that accompany the damage.

Example: Acid damage is persistent and inflicts Charisma and stress damage. If damage resistance reduces acid damage to 0, however, the character does not suffer these additional effects. Damage resistance has the same effect on damage from standard and critical hits.

If damage resistance and damage reduction both apply to any instance of damage, damage reduction is always applied before damage resistance.

HEAlInG

There are several ways a character regains lost vitality and wound points, including natural healing, assisted healing, special gear, and Action Dice. Regaining attribute damage is covered in its own section (see page 17).

Special Note: No form of healing may raise your vitality or wound points above their standard maximums.

nATuRAl HEAlInG

A standard character loses all accumulated damage at the end of every scene (see page 332). A special character (including any PC) regains 1 vitality point per career level per hour of rest, and 1 wound point per day of rest, so long as he restricts himself to light activities during that time (i.e. no combat).

In both cases, this healing occurs even if the character possesses 1 or more critical injuries.

Example: While resting, a 2nd-level character recovers 2 vitality points per hour and 1 wound point per day. Special Note: Higher-level characters do not recover vitality points faster because they actually heal faster — they recover them faster because each vitality point is proportionally less of their total vitality.

ASSISTEd HEAlInG

With a successful Medicine/First Aid check, a standard character loses 1/2 of all accumulated damage (rounded up). This check may also be used to patch up a special character, healing 1d4+1 subdual damage, 1d4+1 wound points, and a number of vitality points equal to his career level (see page 141). In either case, each character may be targeted by this check only once per scene, no matter how many characters are available to attempt it.

With a successful Medicine/Treatment check, one character may double the healing rate of a special character for the current day (see page 143). A standard character may not be targeted with this check.

SPEndInG Action Dice TO HEAl

Outside combat, a standard character may spend and roll any number of Action Dice to reduce his accumulated damage by the total result of the Action Dice spent.

Outside combat, a special character (including any PC) may spend and roll any number of Action Dice to regain vitality or wound points. For each Action Die spent, the character regains either a number of vitality points equal to the action die’s result or 2 wound points.

During combat, a character must take the Refresh action before he may spend 1 Action Die to regain vitality or wound points (see page 359).

OTHER dAMAGE TyPES

The material throughout this section deals almost entirely with lethal damage, but this is only the most common method of injury — a character may suffer from many others. These damage types follow, each of which operates like lethal damage except as noted.

Special Note: Unless otherwise specified, all of the following damage types are also lethal — that is, they also inflict the effects described under Applying Damage (see page 331). Further, a character may sometimes find himself suffering two or more damage types simultaneously (e.g. flash and bang damage, explosive and fire damage, etc.). In these cases, unless otherwise specified, each damage total and its effects are applied separately.

ACId dAMAGE

  • Acid damage always possesses the armor-piercing quality, ranging from AP (1) to AP (20), as noted in each acid’s description When an armored character is hit by acid, roll 1d6: If the target wears partial armor and the result is 1–2, or he wears moderate armor and the result is 1–3, or he wears full armor and the result is 1–4, the acid attack hits the armor; otherwise, it hits the target’s clothes and he doesn’t benefit from the armor’s damage reduction.
  • With a threat or critical hit, the opponent may spend up to 3 Action Dice to cause the attack to hit an equal number of specific items the target carries. Each item hit by the acid must make a Damage save against the acid damage at the start of each round until the acid is washed away. If the character’s armor fails its Damage save, its damage reduction doesn’t apply to the acid damage.
  • When any character is hit by acid, he must make a Reflex save against a DC equal to the acid damage suffered. The character may sacrifice one or both of the half actions he is typically allowed during his next Initiative Count to remove his armor or 1 item, gaining a +1 bonus with this save per half action sacrificed. If the save is successful, the acid damage is reduced to 1/2 before it is applied for the first time (rounded down). If the character removes his armor, its damage reduction doesn’t apply to the acid damage.
  • Acid damage is persistent. A character hit with it suffers its current damage at the start of each round. This damage is automatically reduced to 1/2 at the end of each round (rounded down). Additionally, for each full action the character spends washing the acid away with water, its damage is reduced to 1/2 (rounded down).
  • Acid damage inflicts only one type of critical injury — each time a character suffers 25 or more points of acid damage from a single attack (even if the damage is applied over several rounds), he must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). With failure, he suffers 1 point of permanent Charisma damage (i.e. scarring).
  • Each special character who loses 1 or more vitality or wounds to acid damage also suffers 1/2 as much stress damage (rounded down). A standard character suffers this stress damage each time he makes a Damage save against acid damage.
  • Acid damage may never be converted to subdual damage
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost acid damage.

Example: Kevin is hit by an attack that results in a threat and inflicts 11 points of acid damage. He is wearing moderate armor (a flak jacket), so he rolls 1d6, with a result of 3. The armor is hit and must make a Damage save (DC 15). Kevin’s opponent spends 1 additional Action Die to force a Damage save for Kevin’s weapon as well, again with a DC of 15. The weapon’s Damage save succeeds, but the armor’s Damage save fails, so Kevin can’t benefit from its damage reduction.

Kevin makes a Reflex save (DC 11). He sacrifices 1 half action to remove his armor, gaining a +1 bonus. He rolls a 7 and has a Reflex save bonus of +4, for a result of 12 — enough to reduce the acid damage by one-half to 5 before it’s applied to his vitality and wounds. He has no damage reduction and loses 5 vitality, suffering 2 stress damage as well.

Having already acted during the current round, Kevin can’t spend any time washing the acid off, and at the start of the following round, he loses an additional 2 vitality points and suffers an additional 1 stress damage. Also, when his Initiative Count comes around, he can take only 1 half action, so he can’t effectively wash the acid away. At the start of the next round, another point of acid damage type is applied. This inflicts no additional stress. During the next round, Kevin washes the last of the acid away, reducing the remaining damage from 1 to 0. In total, he suffered 8 points of acid damage and 3 points of stress damage from the attack.

BAnG dAMAGE

  • Bang damage does not affect characters who are deafened. Against a valid target, bang damage possesses the armorpiercing (all) quality.
  • Bang damage tapers off (see Blast, page 343).
  • Bang damage is not applied to the target character’s vitality and wounds and cannot inflict critical injuries; rather, it becomes a DC against which each character must make a Fortitude save. A character who fails this save becomes stunned for a number of rounds equal to 1/2 the difference between his result and the DC (rounded up), and deafened for twice the number of rounds he’s stunned.
    Each character who suffers more than 20 points of bang damage also suffers the effects of the takedown quality (see page 302).
  • Each time a target becomes stunned from bang damage, he also suffers 1d4 stress damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost bang damage.

COld dAMAGE

  • Against a character, cold damage possesses the armor-piercing (all) quality; against all other targets, it does not. Some animals are resistant to cold damage.
  • Cold damage is subdual, not lethal. Each time a character fails a Fortitude save to resist subdual damage inflicted by cold, he also becomes fatigued and suffers 1 point of temporary Constitution damage. A character may not recover from being fatigued or heal this attribute damage until he escapes the source of the cold damage.
  • Cold damage inflicts only one type of critical injury — each time a character suffers 50 or more points of uninterrupted cold damage from a single source (even if the damage is applied over time), he must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). With failure, he suffers 1 point of permanent Constitution damage (i.e. lost extremities and a variety of general health issues).
  • Cold damage is persistent. When produced by frigid air, cold damage is applied once every hour (at 1˚ to 30˚ F), every 10 minutes (at 0˚ to –49˚ F), or every 5 minutes (at –50˚ and below). When produced by freezing liquid, cold damage is applied once every minute (at 40˚ to 60˚ F), or every round (at 39˚ F and below). Cold damage does not drop over time unless the conditions producing it change (e.g. a blizzard ends). While not fatigued, a character may make 1 Survival (Wis) check (DC 20) per damage increment to double the time before damage is applied again. This check may never be re-tried.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost cold damage.

COllISIOn dAMAGE

  • Each person involved in a collision suffers subdual or lethal damage according to the Size and relative Speed of the colliding object and/or character, as shown on Table: Collision Damage.
  • Each object involved in a collision suffers lethal damage according to the Size and relative Speed of the colliding object, as shown on Table: Collision Damage. An object ignores subdual damage.
  • The damage applied to each person or object involved in a collision has the armor-piercing (X) quality, where “X” is equal to the collision’s relative MPH divided by 10 (rounded down). This quality may be further modified by each object or person’s Size, as shown on Table: Collision Damage.
  • Each character who loses 1 or more vitality or wounds to collision damage also suffers 1/4 as much stress damage (rounded down). A standard character suffers this stress damage each time he makes a Damage save against collision damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost collision damage.
Table: Collision Damage
Object/Character SizeObject Damage per 10 MPHCharacter Damage per 10 MPHArmor-Piercing Quality*
Fine and smaller None None N/A
Diminutive 1 subdual None –4
Tiny 1d2 subdual 1 subdual –2
Small 1d4 subdual 1d2 subdual –1
Medium 1d4 lethal 1 lethal +0
Large 1d6 lethal 1d3 lethal +1**
Huge 1d8 lethal 1d4 lethal +2**
Gargantuan 1d12 lethal 1d6 lethal +4**
Colossal 2d10 lethal 1d10 lethal +6**
Enormous 2d12 lethal 1d12 lethal +8**
* These modifiers may not reduce an armor-piercing quality below 0.
** Damage inflicted by objects or people of this Size gains the takedown quality (see page 302).

Example: While standing still, Kevin is hit by a Large car going 40 MPH. He suffers 4d6 lethal damage with the armor-piercing (4) and takedown qualities. The damage rolled is 20 points, so Kevin also suffers 5 points of stress damage.

The car, on the other hand, suffers only 4 lethal damage with the armor-piercing (4) quality.

COnTAGIOn dAMAGE (CHEMICAl, dISEASE, POISOn, RAdIATIOn)

  • Contagion damage only affects characters. Further, a contagion does not initially inflict numerical damage and cannot inflict critical injuries, but rather represents potential exposure and a variety of subsequently debilitating effects (see pages 287–288).
  • When a contagion is delivered by contact, an unwilling target is exposed with a successful melee or unarmed attack.
  • When a contagion is delivered by ingestion, a target is exposed when he consumes contaminated edibles or fluids.
  • When a contagion is delivered by injury, an unwilling special character is exposed if the lethal damage from a prepared attack with a contaminated weapon reduces his wound points by 1 or more (after damage reduction and resistance are applied). An unwilling standard character is exposed when he makes a successful Damage save by 5 or less. Alternately, either character type may be exposed with a prepared syringe and a successful Called Shot action.
  • When a contagion is delivered by inhalation, an unwilling target is exposed when he breathes contaminated air, commonly because he’s failed a Fortitude save to hold his breath (see page 349).
  • Contact- and inhalation-delivered diseases may be contagious. A character is exposed if he comes in contact with any person infected with a contact-delivered contagious disease, or lingers within 100 ft. of a person infected with an inhalation-delivered contagious disease for 10 rounds or more.
  • A held, helpless, sleeping, or unconscious target may be exposed to any contagion with 1 half action. This requires a Ready method of delivery (i.e. an infected weapon, a syringe containing the contagion in solution, etc.). Contagion damage delivered in this fashion has the armor-piercing (all) quality.
  • Each exposed character incubates the contagion for its Primary Onset Time, after which he must make a Fortitude save against its Primary Phase Save DC. With success, he shrugs the entire contagion off and is no longer subject to its effects. With failure he suffers the listed Primary Damage/Effect and incubates the contagion to its Secondary Onset Time, when he must make a second Fortitude save, this time against the Secondary Phase Save DC. With success, he shrugs the contagion off and is no longer subject to its effects. With failure, he suffers the listed Secondary Phase Damage/Effect and incubates the contagion to its Secondary Onset Time, when he must make a third Fortitude save, this time against the Secondary Phase Save DC. This cycle continues until the character successfully saves against the Secondary Phase DC, dies, or the cycle otherwise naturally ends (per the specific contagion’s description).
  • Any character who is exposed to a contagion’s antidote automatically recovers.
  • Each time a character loses 1 or more attribute points to contagion damage, he also suffers an equal amount of stress damage.
  • When a character is exposed to 2 or more doses of the same contagion, he suffers a –1 penalty with saves made against the contagion for each dose to which he’s exposed beyond the first (maximum penalty –10).
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost contagion damage.

ElECTRICAl dAMAGE

  • Electrical damage always possesses the armor-piercing (X) quality, where “X” is equal to the unmodified electrical damage.
  • Some gear is resistant to electrical damage.
  • Electrical damage is subdual, not lethal. Each time a character fails a Fortitude save to resist subdual damage inflicted by electricity, he becomes nauseated for 1d6 rounds and suffers a penalty to his Initiative Count equal to 1/2 the electrical damage (rounded down). If this sends the character reeling (see page 342), it instead knocks him unconscious for a number of minutes equal to the amount by which his Initiative Count drops below 0 (e.g. if the character’s Initiative Count drops to –3, he falls unconscious for 3 minutes).
  • Items that are repaired with the Electronics skill suffer electrical damage as lethal damage.
  • Electrical damage inflicts two types of critical injury. First, each time a character suffers 25 or more points of electrical damage from a single attack, he must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). With failure, he suffers 1 point of permanent Dexterity damage (i.e. nerve damage). Second, each time a character suffers 50 or more points of electrical damage from a single attack, he must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). With failure (and assuming the character makes his second Fortitude save to avoid dropping to –9 wound points), he becomes paralyzed for 2d6 rounds.
  • Each character who loses 1 or more vitality or wounds to electrical damage also suffers 1/4 as much stress damage (rounded down). A standard character suffers this stress damage each time he makes a Damage save against electrical damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost electrical damage.

ExPlOSIvE dAMAGE

  • Explosive damage does not typically possess the armor-piercing quality, except in the case of certain specific explosive gear. Some gear is resistant to explosive damage.
  • Explosive damage tapers off (see Blast, page 343).
  • Each character affected by explosive damage may make a Reflex save against a DC equal to the explosive damage suffered (per the Blast diagram). With success, the damage is reduced to 1/2 standard (rounded down, minimum 1), and the character moves into the nearest square located within the next outermost blast increment (per the GC’s discretion). If the character cannot take this move, and he doesn’t benefit from at least 1/2 cover between him and the explosion, he automatically fails this save. ach character affected by explosive damage must also make a Fortitude save against a DC equal to the explosive damage suffered (per the Blast Diagram). With failure, he becomes stunned for a number of rounds equal to 1/4 the difference between his result and the DC (rounded up).
  • When a character affected by explosive damage took 1 or more half action moves during his most recent Initiative Count, he gains a +4 bonus with both of these saves. If he took 1 or more full action moves in this time period, he gains a +8 bonus with both of these saves. Per the GC’s discretion, these bonuses are negated if the character is moving toward the source of the explosion.
  • Each character who suffers more than 20 points of explosive damage (before DR is applied) — whether it reduces his vitality and wound points or not — also suffers the effects of the takedown quality (see page 302).
  • Each character affected by explosive damage suffers 1d4 stress damage (even if he loses no vitality or wound points as a result). If he loses 1 or more vitality or wound points to explosive damage, he also suffers 1/4 as much stress damage (rounded down). A standard character suffers all of this stress damage each time he makes a Damage save against explosive damage.
  • When an object or piece of scenery overlaps 2 or more squares flooded with explosive damage, it makes only 1 Damage save, against the highest amount of damage inflicted in any single square it occupies.
  • Explosive damage may never be converted to subdual damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost explosive damage.

fAllInG dAMAGE

  • Falling damage always possesses the armor-piercing (1 per 10 ft.) quality.
  • Without a successful Acrobatics/Falling check (see page 106), a character falling onto any solid surface, such as the ground, suffers 1d6 lethal damage per 10 ft. fallen (max. 20d6).
  • Without a successful Acrobatics/Falling check, a character falling onto any fluid surface, such as water, suffers 1d6 subdual damage per 10 ft. fallen (maximum 20d6). The character may make an Acrobatics/Falling check (DC 15 + 5 per 25 ft.) to dive into water, suffering no damage so long as the water has a minimum depth of 10 ft. per 30 ft. the character dives.
  • When a character lands on a soft or yielding surface (e.g. a stunt mattress), his falling damage is calculated as if the fall were 10 ft. shorter (minimum 0 ft.).
  • Each character who faills 30 ft. or more suffers 2 stress damage per die of lethal falling damage suffered.
  • Without a successful Acrobatics/Falling check, a character becomes sprawled upon landing.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost falling damage.

fIRE dAMAGE

  • Fire damage always has the armor-piercing (X) quality, where “X“ is set by the fire’s temperature, as shown on Table: Fire Damage AP Values. Some gear is resistant to fire damage.
  • Fire damage is tracked by square and by character. At the start of each round during which 10 or more points of fire damage are inflicted within any square, each character within the square must make a Reflex save against the damage or catch on fire. Further, the square must make a Damage save against the damage or catch on fire (see page 224).
  • A burning character suffers fire damage at the start of each round. This damage is equal to the fire damage that initially set the character on fire until the fire spreads, is put out, or goes out naturally. A burning character must make a Will save against the fire damage to perform any action other than to enter the closest square that isn’t burning (per the movement rules), Drop Prone (with 1 half action), and begin rolling to put it out. For each half action the character spends rolling on the ground in a square that isn’t on fire, the fire damage from which he suffers is reduced to 1/2 (rounded down).
  • At the end of each round, the GC makes 1 Damage save against the fire damage, using the lowest Damage save bonus of any square adjacent to the fire’s edge. If this Damage save succeeds by 5 or more, the fire starts to burn down, its damage reduced to 1/2 (rounded down). With a failure, however, the fire spreads by 1 square + 1 additional square per 5 by which this Damage save fails, each square of spread occurring roughly in a direction determined with the Deviation Diagram (see page 346). Further, each time the fire spreads, its total damage increases by 1d6 (maximum 100 points of damage per fire). A fire may also spread vertically using this rule.
  • Per GC discretion, every important item within a burning square or carried by a burning character must make a Damage save against the damage or catch on fire. Items inside a container only make this save once the container fails its save.
  • When a burning character stands in a burning square, both the character and every exposed item in the square suffer the highest fire damage affecting either of them.
  • For each gallon of water sprayed or poured onto a burning character or into a burning square, a fire’s damage is permanently reduced by 1d6. Patting a blanket or similar cover over a fire permanently reduces its damage by 1d4. Fire extinguishers reduce fire damage by 2d6 each round.
  • Fire damage inflicts only one type of critical injury — each time a character suffers 25 or more points of fire damage from a single fire (even if the damage is applied over several rounds), he must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). With failure, he suffers 1 point of permanent Charisma damage (i.e. scarring).
  • At the start of each round when a character stands within a burning square, comes in contact with a fire, or is hit with a fire attack, he suffers the fire’s current damage. Each character who loses 1 or more vitality or wounds to fire damage also suffers an equal amount of stress damage. A standard character suffers this stress damage each time he makes a Damage save against fire damage.
  • Any character 10 or more ft. above a fire is immune to its effects.
  • Fire damage may never be converted to subdual damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost fire damage.

Example: A small fire breaks out in the square north of Kevin, which contains a control panel he needs to access. The GC determines that the fire begins at 2d6 damage and rolls an 11. Kevin takes 1 half action to pull his coat off and uses his remaining half action to pat the fire down, reducing its damage by 1d4. He rolls a 2. The fire’s damage is 9.

At the end of the round, the GC makes a Damage save for surrounding squares. Being drywall, each adjacent square has a Damage save bonus of +6. The GC rolls a 1, which fails. Consulting the Deviation Diagram, the GC determines that the fire spreads 1 square to the south (into Kevin’s square). The fire damage also increases by 1d6. The GC rolls a 4, which brings the fire’s damage to 13.

At the start of the next round, Kevin suffers 13 points of damage and 13 points of stress damage. He must also make a Reflex save to avoid catching on fire. Fortunately, he scores a result of 18 — more than enough to avoid the flames. He uses his bonus 5-ft. step to move north into the panel’s square, where he uses one of his half actions to activate the necessary controls and the other to pat the fire down again. He rolls a 3, reducing the fire damage down to 10.

The round ends and the GC makes another Damage save, this time against the fire’s current damage of 10. He rolls an 18, for a total of 22. The fire starts to die down, its damage dropping to 5. Kevin suffers an additional 5 points each of fire and stress damage at the start of the following round. He also makes another Reflex save against the current fire damage. He fails, rolling a 1, and catches fire. At the start of his Initiative Count, he makes a Will save with a result of 12. Though this is enough for him not to panic and Run out of the flames, he does so anyway, using 1 half action to move into an adjacent square that isn’t on fire and 1 half action to Drop Prone.

At this point, two of his allies arrive with buckets of water and dump them on him, the first reducing Kevin’s fire damage from 5 to 2 and the other dousing the remaining 2 points before it does any more harm.

Table: Fire Damage AP Values
TemperatureExamplesArmor Piercing Value
250–500˚ F Direct sunlight in outer space (248˚ F), oven (300–475˚ F), burning paper (451˚ F) 4
501–750˚ F Nuclear reactor coolant (550+˚ F), steam turbine (675˚ F) 8
751–1,000˚ F Burning gasoline (900+˚ F) 12
1,001–1,500˚ F Rocket exhaust (1,000+˚ F), house fire (1,100+˚ F), burning natural gas (1,200˚ F), crematorium (1,400+˚ F) 16
1,501–3,000˚ F Molten aluminum (1,500+˚ F), burning napalm/diesel fuel (1,800˚ F), burning aviation gasoline (2,000˚ F), lava (2,100˚ F), blowtorch (2,400˚ F) 20
3,001–6,000˚ F Molten steel (3,000+˚ F), spacecraft re-entry (3,000+˚ F), burning magnesium (3,500˚ F), burning white phosphorus (3,600˚ F), burning thermite (4,500˚ F), nuclear reactor meltdown (5,000˚ F) 24
6,001+˚ F Atomic hydrogen blowtorch (6,700˚ F), surface of the sun (12,000˚ F), lightning-generated plasma (50,000˚ F) 28

flASH dAMAGE

  • Flash damage only affects characters who are not blinded, and who have line of sight to the source of the damage. Against such a target, flash damage possesses the armor-piercing (all) quality.
  • Flash damage tapers off (see Blast, page 343).
  • Flash damage is not applied to the target character’s vitality and wounds and cannot inflict critical injuries, but rather becomes a DC against which each affected character must make a Fortitude save. Characters who fail become blinded for a number of rounds equal to 1/4 the difference between the save result and the DC (rounded up).
  • Each time a target becomes blinded from flash damage, he also suffers 1d4 stress damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost flash damage.

HEAT dAMAGE

  • Against a character, heat damage possesses the armor-piercing (all) quality; against any other target, it does not. Some animals are resistant to heat damage.
  • Heat damage is subdual, not lethal. A character wearing armor suffers a penalty with Fortitude saves made to resist the effects of subdual damage: –2 for partial armor, –4 for moderate armor, and –8 for full armor. Each time a character fails a Fortitude save to resist subdual damage inflicted by heat, he also becomes fatigued and suffers 1 point of temporary Strength damage. A character may not recover from being fatigued or heal this attribute damage until he escapes the source of the heat damage.
  • Heat damage only inflicts one type of critical injury — each time a character suffers 50 or more points of uninterrupted heat damage from a single source (even if the damage is applied over time), he must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). With failure, he suffers 1 point of permanent Strength damage (i.e. traumatized muscle tissue).
  • Heat damage is persistent. When produced by sweltering air, heat damage is applied once every hour (at 90˚ to 109˚ F), every 10 minutes (at 110˚ to 139˚ F), or every 5 minutes (at 140˚ and above). When produced by hot or boiling liquid, heat damage is applied once every minute (at 110˚ to 200˚ F), or every round (at 201˚ F and above). Heat damage does not drop over time unless the conditions producing it change (e.g. a character escapes a blistering desert). While not fatigued, a character may make 1 Survival (Wis) check (DC 20) per damage increment to double the time before damage is applied again. This check may never be re-tried.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost heat damage.

lASER dAMAGE

  • Laser damage always possesses the armor-piercing (X) quality, where “X” is equal to the unmodified laser damage. Some gear is resistant to laser damage.
  • Any attack that inflicts laser damage ignores all dodge bonuses to Defense.
  • Laser damage — and consequently, its armor-piercing quality — is reduced by 1 damage die per range increment after the first (e.g. when a character hits a target in his 3rd range increment with an attack that inflicts 3d6 laser damage, the attack inflicts only 1d6 damage).
  • When a threat is scored with an attack that inflicts laser damage, , the cost to activate it as a critical hit is reduced by 1 Action Die (minimum 0).
  • Each character who loses 1 or more vitality or wounds to laser damage also suffers 1/4 as much stress damage (rounded down). A standard character suffers this stress damage each time he makes a Damage save against laser damage.
  • Laser damage may never be converted to subdual damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost laser damage.

SnEAk ATTACk dAMAGE

  • Sneak attack damage only affects characters.
  • Sneak attack damage is granted by class and feat abilities, as well as a limited number of other character options, and always grants a number of bonus d6 damage dice. When a character possesses 1 or more dice of Sneak attack damage, he may use them to augment the damage of each attack made against a target he’s flanking (see page 341), or who’s helpless or vulnerable.
  • When Sneak attack damage augments an attack’s damage, it is not applied separately; instead, it is added to the attack’s damage and they’re applied together as one result (e.g. when a character makes an attack with 1d8 lethal damage and may apply 1d6 Sneak attack damage, the character rolls 1d8, scoring a 6, and 1d6, scoring a 4, for a total damage result of 10).
  • Unless otherwise specified, Sneak attack damage may augment any attack — even an attack that inflicts subdual damage (in which case the Sneak attack damage is subdual, not lethal).
  • Sneak attack damage may only augment the damage of a Standard Attack action. • Sneak attack damage may not augment the damage of any attack that’s converted from subdual to lethal, or vice versa (see page 345).
  • Sneak attack damage may not augment an attack targeting a character who is immune to critical hits, who is hidden to the attacker, or whose vitals are out of reach (per the GC’s discretion). Sneak attack damage may only augment an unarmed or melee attack, or a ranged attack against a target within CQB range. Beyond that, the accuracy required to hit the target’s vitals cannot be managed.
  • With each successful Sneak attack, the target suffers 1 stress damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost Sneak attack damage.

STRESS dAMAGE

  • Stress damage only affects characters. Against a valid target, stress damage always possesses the armor-piercing (all) quality.
  • Stress damage is not applied to the target character’s vitality and wounds and cannot inflict critical injuries, but is rather accumulated over time until it wears off.
  • Each time a character suffers 1 or more points of stress damage, , if his current stress damage total exceeds a multiple of his Wisdom score (e.g. 1 × his Wisdom score, 2 × his Wisdom score, etc.), he must make a Will save. The highest threshold exceeded by the total stress damage accumulated to date determines this save’s DC, as shown on Table: Stress Damage DCs. With failure, the character suffers the listed condition (see page 340 for each condition’s effect).
  • A critical hit with an attack that inflicts stress damage forces an immediate Will save, even if a threshold is not exceeded. This save’s DC is 16 (if no threshold has been exceeded) or the DC for the highest threshold exceeded +4.
  • At any time outside combat, stress damage wears off according to the character’s current stress condition, as shown on Table: Stress Damage DCs. Stress damage does not wear off during combat. When a character’s stress damage drops below a threshold, he loses the corresponding condition.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost stress damage.

Example: Kevin has a Wisdom score of 12. He accumulated 10 points of stress damage before he reached the villain’s lair and his brush with a control panel fire spikes this total to 28 — more than twice his Wisdom score. Kevin must make a Will save (DC 16). He fails with a result of 12, gaining the shaken II condition. In his current state, Kevin heals 1 point of stress damage every 10 minutes.

Table: Stress Damage DCs
Threshold ExceededDCConditionHealing Rate
1 × Wis score 12 Shaken I 1 point per minute
2 × Wis score 16 Shaken II 1 point per 10 minutes
3 × Wis score 20 Shaken III 1 point per hour
4 × Wis score 24 Shaken IV 1 point per day
5 × Wis score 28 Drained (1 level)* 1 point per week
* This effect lingers even if the character’s stress damage drops below the threshold required to trigger it. A drained character may only recover at the end of each mission.

SuBduAl dAMAGE

  • Subdual damage only affects characters.
  • Damage reduction is twice as effective against subdual damage (e.g. with DR 3/—, a character ignores the first 6 points of subdual damage).
  • Subdual damage is not applied to the target character’s vitality and wounds and cannot inflict critical injuries, but is rather accumulated over time until it wears off.
  • Each time a character suffers 1 or more points of subdual damage if his current subdual damage total exceeds a multiple of his Constitution score (e.g. 1 × his Constitution score, 2 × his Constitution score, etc.), he must make a Fortitude save. The highest threshold exceeded by the total subdual damage accumulated to date determines this save’s DC, as shown on Table: Subdual Damage DCs. With failure, the character becomes unconscious for the listed knockout duration × 1/2 the difference between his result and the DC.
  • A critical hit with an attack that inflicts subdual damage forces an immediate Fortitude save, even if a threshold is not exceeded. This save’s DC is 16 (if no threshold has been exceeded) or the DC for the highest threshold exceeded +4.
  • At any time outside combat, subdual damage wears off accoring to the character’s current subdual condition, as shown on Table: Subdual Damage DCs. Subdual damage does not wear off during combat.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost subdual damage.

Example: Kevin has a Constitution score of 10. A henchman pummels him, inflicting 18 points of subdual damage and forcing him to make a Fortitude save (DC 12). He succeeds with a result of 15, avoiding a knockout that would have lasted 1 or more rounds. In Kevin’s current state, he heals 1 point of subdual damage every minute once the combat ends.

Table: Subdual Damage DCs
Threshold ExceededDCKnockout DurationHealing Rate
1 × Con score 12 1 round 1 point per minute
2 × Con score 16 1 minute 1 point per 10 minutes
3 × Con score 20 1 hour 1 point per hour
4 × Con score 24 1 day 1 point per day
5 × Con score 28 1 week 1 point per week

vACuuM dAMAGE

  • Against a character, vacuum damage possesses the armor-piercing (all) quality; against all other targets, it does not. Some gear is resistant to vacuum damage.
  • A character subjected to a vacuum suffers 5d6 lethal damage per round. This damage does not drop over time unless the conditions producing it change (e.g. a character reaches an area with pressurized air). During the first round only, a character may make a Fortitude save (DC 15) to reduce this damage to 1/2 (rounded down). The GC may determine that an area of extremely low pressure inflicts between 1d6 and 4d6 vacuum damage per round, but this is quite uncommon.
  • A character suffering from vacuum damage simultaneously suffers s from suffocation (see page 349).
  • Vacuum damage inflicts only one type of critical injury — each time a character suffers 25 or more points of uninterrupted vacuum damage from a single source (even if the damage is applied over time), he must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). With failure, he suffers 1 point of permanent Wisdom damage (i.e. brain and sensory damage).
  • Each character who loses 1 or more vitality or wounds to vacuum damage also suffers 1/2 as much stress damage (rounded up). A standard character suffers this stress damage each time he makes a Damage save against vacuum damage.
  • Action dice may not be spent to boost vacuum damage.