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This gear category includes all weapons except those installed into vehicles (which are gained with Vehicle upgrades).

Weapon Basics

There are 16 weapon proficiencies: Blunt, Edged, Exotic (Blunt), Exotic (Edged), Exotic (Hurled), Explosives, Guided, Handgun, Hurled, Indirect Fire, Rifle, Shotgun, Submachine Gun, Tactical, Unarmed, and Vehicle Weapon.

Also, there are 29 personal weapon categories: Blunt, Exotic Blunt, Edged, Exotic Edged, Hurled, Exotic Hurled, Backup Pistols, Holdout Pistols, Service Pistols, Backup Revolvers, Hunting Revolvers, Service Revolvers, Assault Rifles, Bolt-Action Rifles, Semi-Automatic Rifles, Break-Action Shotguns, Pump-Action Shotguns, Semi-Automatic Shotguns, Light Submachine Guns, Heavy Submachine Guns, Squad Automatic Weapons (SAWs), General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMGs), Heavy Machine Guns (HMGs), Explosives, Flamethrowers, Grenade Launchers, Missile Launchers, Mortars, and Rocket Launchers.

In most cases, one weapon proficiency applies to all attacks made using any weapon in a category, as shown on Table: Weapon Basics. Grenade launchers employ two different proficiencies depending on their use (see page 298). Table: Weapon Basics also lists the key attribute applied to weapon attacks, as well as the additional penalty for making an "untrained" attack check with a weapon from each category (i.e. an attack without the appropriate proficiency). Unless a rule specifically allows a character to apply a different proficiency when making an attack with a weapon, the proficiency listed here applies at all times. This is the case even when an attack's type is changed (e.g. even though the knuckles weapon quality states that attacks with a weapon possessing the quality are considered unarmed, the quality does not allow the character to use the Unarmed proficiency with attacks using the weapon).

Finally, Table: Weapon Basics also presents the Damage save bonus of weapons in each category and the fire modes that may be adopted with weapons in each category (for more information about fire modes, see below).

Table: weapon basics
Category Proficiency Key Attribute Untrained Penalty Damage Save Fire Modes
Unarmed Unarmed Str -2 N/A N/A
Blunt Str -2 +10 N/A  
Exotic Blunt Exotic (Blunt) Str -6 +5 N/A
Edged Edged Str -4 +8 N/A
Exotic Edged Exotic (Edged) Str -8 +6 N/A
Hurled Hurled Dex -2 +4 N/A
Exotic Hurled Exotic (Hurled) Dex -6 +3 N/A
Backup Pistols Handgun Dex -6 +10 Single-Shot
Holdout Pistols Handgun Dex -6 +8 Single-Shot
Service Pistols Handgun Dex -4 +10 Single-Shot
Backup Revolvers Handgun Dex -6 +10 Single-Shot
Hunting Revolvers Handgun Dex -4 +11 Single-Shot
Service Revolvers Handgun Dex -4 +11 Single-Shot
Assault Rifles Rifle Dex -6 +10 Single-Shot, Burst, Full Auto
Bolt-Action Rifles Rifle Dex -4 +10 Single-Shot
Semi-Automatic Rifles Rifle Dex -4 +10 Single-Shot
Break-Action Shotguns Shotgun Dex -4 +8 Single-Shot
Pump-Action Shotguns Shotgun Dex -4 +10 Single-Shot
Semi-Automatic Shotguns Shotgun Dex -4 +10 Single-Shot
Light Submachine Guns Submachine Gun Dex -4 +6 Single-Shot, Burst, Full Auto
Heavy Submachine Guns Submachine Gun Dex -4 +8 Single-Shot, Burst, Full Auto
Squad Automatic Weapons (SAWs) Rifle Dex -6 +10 Burst, Full Auto *
General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMGs) Tactical Dex -8 +10 Burst, Full Auto *
Heavy Machine Guns (HMGs) Tactical Dex -8 +10 Burst, Full Auto *
Explosives Explosives Int -8 +2 N/A
Flamethrowers Tactical Dex -8 +5 Single-Shot, Burst, Full Auto
Grenade Launchers Tactical/Indirect † Dex/Int † -6/-10 +8 Single-Shot
Missile Launchers Guided Int -10 +7 Single-Shot **
Mortars Indirect Int -12 +11 Single-Shot **
Rocket Launchers Tactical Dex -8 +7 Single-Shot **
Vehicle Weapons †† Varies †† Varies †† Varies †† +14 Varies ††
* Further, these weapons target a number of squares with the Suppressive Fire action equal to the character's Strength modifier + 2 (see page 361).
** No character ability or other effect may increase these fire modes.
† The Tactical proficiency applies with Dexterity as the key attribute when a grenade launcher is fired directly at a target within the character's line of sight. The Indirect proficiency applies with Intelligence as the key attribute when a grenade launcher is fired at any target out of the character's line of sight (see Indirect Fire, page 300).
†† Vehicle weapons are considered part of the Vehicle gear category and are gained with Vehicle upgrades. The rules for using each vehicular weapon type are described in a separate section (see page 297).

"Ready" Weapons

The term "ready" or "readied" is used throughout Spycraft 2.0 to refer to a weapon that a character holds and may use to attack without delay (e.g. a knife in hand, a strung bow, a loaded and held pistol, etc.). This term has nothing to do with the Ready action (see page 359).

Fire Modes

Firearms and heavy weapons may be used in one of three modes: Single-Shot, Burst, and Full Auto. A weapon's mode dictates the actions it can perform in combat, as shown on Table 5.15: Actions (see page 352).

Most weapons in each category can fire in only one or two of these modes, as shown on Table: Weapon Basics, though some specific weapons possess the nonstandard fire modes quality, deviating from the norm. Weapon upgrades and other effects may also change the fire modes available to a weapon. Unless otherwise specified, switching between available modes requires 1 free action.

Guided Weapons

A guided weapon can alter its course mid-flight to precisely strike far-away targets. All guided weapons possess the guided quality and require the Guided weapon proficiency for trained use. Guided weapons may not target characters - they must target a vehicle or structure.

There are two types of guided weapons: self-guided and terminal guided. Self-Guided Weapons: These "fire-and-forget" weapons include radar- and infrared-guided missiles and sonar-guided torpedoes. Their onboard sensor system and computer processor allows them to target a vehicle or structure's signature Defense (see page 291), as shown on Table: Self-Guided Weapons.

Table: self-guided weapons
Guidance System Signature Defense
Global positioning system (GPS) 15 (one 5-ft. square)*
Infrared Thermal**
Radar Radar**
Sonar Sonar**
* This attack doesn't suffer range penalties, but any miss with it deviates the standard distance × 100. Further, it cannot hit any moving target and requires precise positioning data (down to the target's exact 5-ft. × 5-ft. coordinates). Often, this requires a character in the field to physically map the coordinates ahead of the attack.
** This attack doesn't suffer vision penalties.

Two attack checks are required to fire a self-guided weapon, the first of which is used to "lock" the second onto the target. No ammunition is lost if the first attack misses, but the second attack - which actually fires the shot - suffers a -20 penalty. The attacker may re-try the first attack check to gain a lock, negating this penalty.

No self-guided weapon may attack a target of smaller than Large Size.

Terminal-Guided Weapons: These include laser- and wire-guided missiles. Terminal-guided weapons must receive direct input from a human operator until they impact. Each attack with a terminalguided weapon must be aimed, and an additional Aim action must be taken during each round of hang time (see right), lest the operator suffer a -20 penalty with his attack check.

Only the first Aim action taken grants a bonus to attack; each additional Aim action negates the penalty for 1 range increment to the target. The same character must take all of these Aim actions, including the first. With a television- or wire-guided weapon, this character must be the attacker. With a laser-guided weapon, however, it may be anyone who can "paint" the target with a laser designator (see page 226).

Indirect Fire

Some weapons launch projectiles on long, arcing trajectories and may strike targets outside line of sight - in some cases, even over the horizon. This is known as "indirect fire." A character possessing the Indirect weapon proficiency may make this type of attack with any weapon capable of indirect fire.

An indirect fire attack always targets one 5-ft. square. To make an indirect fire attack, a character must either be able to see the target square or be in voice contact with another character who can (this character is referred to as a forward observer). When making an attack against a target he can see, the character resolves the attack normally.

When making an attack with the assistance of a forward observer, the forward observer must first take 1 half action to relay the target square's coordinates. This requires a Tactics (Int) skill check (DC 15) that has the Concentration and Vision tags (see page 101). With success, the attacking character may make his attack, but his attack check gains a result cap equal to the forward observer's skill check result.

A forward observer who watches an indirect fire attack land can "adjust fire," relaying instructions to the attacker to improve his next attack. This requires 1 additional half action and another Tactics skill check (DC 15). Each successful adjustment grants the attacker a cumulative +1 morale bonus with indirect fire attack checks targeting the same square (maximum equal to the attacker's Wisdom modifier, if positive).

Hang Time

"Hang time" is the delay between a slow- or far-moving weapon attack and its strike. The distance to the target determines an appropriate attack's hang time, as shown on Table: Hang Time.

Table: Hang time
Distance to Target Hang Time
1 range increment None
2-3 range increments 1 round
4-6 range increments 2 rounds
7-10 range increments 3 rounds

When a character fires a weapon that's subject to hang time, he doesn't make the attack check until his Initiative Count during the round in which the hang time ends (all modifiers are applied based on the round the attack was initiated, however). The attack is resolved immediately after the character makes his attack check. Each attack with hang time must target a square; it may not target a character, vehicle, or item.

Small- and Large-Scale melee Weapons

A melee weapon scaled for a Small character is requested at the standard cost and is subject to the following rules.

  • The weapon's Size decreases by 1 category.
  • If the weapon's threat range is 19-20 or better, it worsens by 1 (e.g. a threat range of 18-20 becomes 19-20).
  • If the weapon's damage includes a flat bonus (e.g. 1d4+1, 1d6+2, etc.), the bonus decreases by 1. If the weapon has no flat bonus (e.g. 1d4, 1d6), its damage decreases to the next lower die type (e.g. 1d6 damage becomes 1d4). If the weapon's damage is 2d6, it becomes 1d12.

A melee weapon scaled for a Large character costs 1 additional upgrade (though the GC may choose to waive this increase if the setting includes many Large characters). Further, the weapon is subject to the following rules.

  • The weapon's Size increases by 1 category.
  • The weapon's damage die type increases by 1 (e.g. 1d4 becomes 2d4, 1d6+1 becomes 1d8+1, etc.). If the weapon's damage is 1d12, it becomes 2d6+1.

Throwing Non-Hurled Weapons

The general rules for hurled weapon ranges are found in the table key on page 225. When a character throws a non-hurled weapon, however - such as a sword - his range increment is equal to 5 ft. × (his Strength Modifier + 1, minimum 2).

Further, the character suffers a -2 penalty with his attack check when throwing a 1-handed melee weapon, or a -6 penalty with his attack check when throwing a 2-handed melee weapon.

Weapon Qualities

Qualities are one of the ways that broad, identical rules are applied to large numbers of vehicles and weapons. Qualities may not be added or removed except through the application of certain upgrades (see page 315). The following section contains weapon qualities; vehicle qualities are handled in a separate section.

A weapon may not possess two mutually exclusive qualities (e.g. accurized and either imprecise or inaccurate, bulky and discreet, dependable and unreliable, rugged and fragile). If a weapon possesses one of these qualities and gains the other, both qualities are lost (though one of them may be added later without incident).

Accurized (ACC): When a character makes a trained and aimed attack with this weapon, the threat range increases by 1.

Anti-Aircraft (AIR): When this weapon is used to attack an aircraft, the vehicle gains no Defense bonus based on compared Acceleration Ratings (see page 289).

Armor-Piercing (AP): This quality applies to weapon damage, reducing damage reduction (see page 332).

Blast (BLS): This weapon's attacks utilize the blast rules (see page 343), with a blast increment following this quality in parentheses.

Bleed (BLD): Each time a character suffers damage from an attack with this weapon, he must make a Reflex save (DC equal to the damage inflicted before DR is applied). With failure, he begins bleeding. If the character loses 1 or more wound points due to this attack, his Reflex save DC increases by 10.

Bulky (BLK): Each skill check made to conceal this weapon suffers a -2 penalty.

Collapsible Stock (CLS): This weapon features a collapsible stock that increases accuracy but also makes the weapon easier to spot. When the stock is extended, the weapon's Recoil decreases by 2 but observers gain a +2 bonus with all Notice and Search checks made to spot the weapon.

Composite (CMP): Nonferrous materials such as polymers or titanium render this weapon less obvious to magnetic detection. A metal detector does not automatically spot this weapon (see page 437), but rather must make a Notice/Awareness check with a skill bonus equal to its Power Rating × 2. The character trying to slip the weapon past the detector opposes its skill check result with a Sleight of Hand/Stash Item check. With success, the weapon slips through unnoticed.

Dependable (DEP): The action die cost to activate any error made using this weapon increases by 1.

Discreet (DST): Each skill check made to conceal this weapon gains a +6 bonus (if the weapon is a holdout pistol), a +4 bonus (if the weapon is a backup pistol), or a +2 bonus (otherwise).

Finesse (FIN): When a character makes a trained attack with this weapon, he may substitute his Dexterity modifier for his Strength modifier when inflicting damage. In this case, he gains no benefit for using the weapon with 2 hands.

Fragile (FRG): This weapon suffers a -2 penalty with all Damage saves.

Gatling (GAT): This machine gun uses multiple rotating barrels to produce a high rate of fire. It may only be fired in Full Auto mode, regardless of character options and other effects that might permit attacks in Single-Shot or Burst mode.

When this weapon is used to take an Autofire action, each volley uses 25 shots instead of the standard 3 (and again, no character option or effect may reduce this amount). Each target loses his dodge bonus to Defense against this attack, and 1 additional shot hits the target for every 2 by which the attack result exceeds the target's Defense, rather than the standard 4.

When this weapon is used to take a Strafe action, or to make an attack granted by the Suppressive Fire action, 1 additional shot hits each target for every 5 by which the attack result exceeds that target's Defense.

Guard (GAR): When a character possessing the appropriate proficiency holds this weapon ready, he gains the bonus following the quality in parentheses to Defense against melee and unarmed attacks. If a character possessing the appropriate proficiency holds 2 such weapons, he gains both bonuses to Defense.

Guided (GUI): Attacks with this weapon use special rules (see Guided Weapons, page 300). The weapon's guidance type follows the quality in parentheses.

Hardpoint-Mounted (HDM): This weapon may be mounted on a vehicle hardpoint (see page 294). Each full reload installed with the weapon requires 1 additional hardpoint.

Hook (HOK): A character holding this weapon ready gains the listed gear bonus with all skill checks made as part of a Disarm action.

Imprecise (IMP): This weapon isn't noted for pinpoint accuracy, and firing it into melee may be more dangerous to allies than enemies. Attacks with this weapon ignore all feat and class abilities that decrease the target's cover, as well as all abilities and other effects that eliminate the penalties for firing into melee (see page 328).

Inaccurate (INA): Each attack made with this weapon suffers the penalty listed in parentheses following this quality.

Indirect Fire (IND): This weapon may be used to make an indirect fire attack (see page 300).

Injector (INJ): Each time a character suffers damage from an attack with this weapon, he must make a Reflex save (DC equal to 10 + the damage he sustained before DR was applied). With failure, he is exposed to the loaded contagion (acquired separately). If the character loses 1 or more wound points due to this attack, he is automatically exposed to the loaded contagion.

Integral Suppressor (INS): Each Notice and Search check made to hear this weapon firing suffers a -10 penalty. This penalty increases to -15 if subsonic ammunition is used. The weapon loses this quality if any barrel upgrade is installed.

Keen (KEN): When a character hits with a trained attack with this weapon, his damage increases by the number following the quality in parentheses for the purpose of determining critical injuries only.

Knuckles (NKL): Attacks with this weapon are always considered unarmed. Further, this weapon's damage is added to its wearer's base unarmed damage with any successful Standard Attack.

Manual Action (MAC): This firearm requires the user to perform some additional action to chamber each new bullet after firing. Each time an attack is made with this weapon, the attacker's Initiative Count decreases by the number following this quality in parentheses - unless this is the first attack since the weapon was reloaded.

Massive (MAS): When a character whose Strength score is 14 or lower attacks with this weapon, he suffers a -4 penalty with his attack check. Further, each attack with this weapon decreases the character's Initiative Count by an amount equal to 4 minus his Strength modifier (minimum 0).

Table: Firearm upgrade locations
Firearm Sub-Category Rail* Underbarrel*
Pistol, Backup None None
Pistol, Holdout None None
Pistol, Service 1 None
Revolver, Backup None None
Revolver, Hunting 1 None
Revolver, Service None None
Rifle, Assault 1 1
Rifle, Bolt-Action 1 1
Rifle, Semi-Automatic 1 1
Shotgun, Break-Action 1 None
Shotgun, Pump-Action 1 None
Shotgun, Semi-Automatic 1 None
Submachine Gun, Light 1 None
Submachine Gun, Heavy 1 None
Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) 1 1
General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG) 1 1
Heavy Machine Gun (HMG) None None
* Unless otherwise specified, rail and underbarrel mounts are mutually exclusive - a firearm with an upgrade attached in one of these locations cannot benefit from an upgrade in the other.

Non-Standard Upgrade Locations (NUL): This weapon's upgrade locations don't conform to the standard for its weapon category (see Table: Upgrade Locations). The weapon's actual upgrade locations follow this quality in parentheses - "R" for rail or "U" for underbarrel or rail (e.g. "2R/1U" means that the weapon can accept 2 rail upgrades and 1 underbarrel upgrade).

Non-Standard Fire Modes (NFM): This weapon's fire modes don't conform to the standard for its weapon category (see Table: Weapon Basics). Its actual fire modes follow this quality in parentheses - "S" for Single-Shot, "B" for Burst, and "F" for Full Auto (e.g. "B/F" means that the weapon may toggle between the Burst and Full Auto modes).

One-Shot (ONE): This weapon is disposable and designed to be fired once and thrown away. It may not be reloaded.

Ornamented (ORN): This weapon is engraved or features a precious metal inlay, granting its wielder a +1 gear bonus with Impress checks while the target has line of sight to it. The weapon loses this quality if it suffers any critical hit (though it may be restored with a successful Mechanics/Repair check).

Overheat (OVH): Poor heat dissipation causes this weapon to malfunction when used for sustained automatic fire. If this weapon is fired in Full Auto mode during 2 or more subsequent rounds, its error range increases by an additional 1 per round during which it was fired in Full Auto mode beyond the first (maximum error range 1-10). This effect lingers until the weapon is left unused for 10 minutes.

Quirky (QKY): Non-standard design features make this weapon awkward for inexperienced users. Its untrained attack check penalty increases by 4.

Reach (RCH): When a character makes a trained attack with this weapon, his Reach increases by the number following the quality in parentheses. However, he suffers a -5 penalty when attacking an adjacent target.

Rugged (RGD): This exceptionally sturdy weapon gains a +2 bonus with all Damage saves if it's Medium size or smaller. For each Size category above Medium, this bonus increases by an additional +2 (e.g. +4 for Large weapons, +6 for Huge weapons, +8 for Gargantuan weapons, etc.).

Safe Action (SAF): This weapon cannot explode due to a critical failure.

Slow Attack (SLA): Each time an attack is made with this weapon, the attacker's Initiative Count decreases by 4.

Slow Loading (SLD): Unwieldy or large ammunition makes this weapon difficult to reload. Each Reload action requires a number of half actions equal to the number listed in parentheses following this quality.

Superior Accuracy (SPA): When a character makes a trained, aimed, and braced attack using this weapon, the threat range increases by 1. This quality may not be added to any weapon possessing the imprecise or inaccurate qualities.

Sure Grip (SUR): When holding this weapon ready, a character gains a +3 gear bonus with skill checks made to resist a Disarm action targeting the weapon.

Susceptible (SUS): This explosive is vulnerable to one or more damage types, as listed in parentheses following this quality. If an explosive is exposed to damage to which it's vulnerable, its owner makes an extra Damage save. With failure, the explosive detonates. If a character is carrying the explosive at the time, he may not make Reflex save to reduce the damage.

Takedown (TKD): The kinetic energy delivered by this weapon has near-cinematic "knockdown power." Each time a character suffers damage from an attack with this weapon, he must make a Fortitude save (DC equal to the damage he sustained before DR was applied). With failure, he becomes sprawled. If the character loses 1 or more wound points due to this attack, the save DC increases by 10.

Threaded Barrel (TBR): The end of this gun's barrel is machined with a set of screw threads, allowing the installation of barrel upgrades (see page 315). While not illegal in and of itself, a threaded barrel is commonly used to attach a suppressor, and thus may arouse the suspicion of law enforcement officers.

Towable (TOW): This vehicular weapon may be acquired in a trailer-mounted or towed version for an additional 25% of its base price (rounded up).

Trained Only (TRO): This weapon is sufficiently alien that any inexperienced user is simply lost - untrained attack checks are impossible with it.

Tripod-Mountable (TPD): This vehicular weapon may be tripodmounted for an additional 10% of its base price (rounded up).

Tripping (TRP): When a character possessing the appropriate proficiency holds this weapon ready, he may use it to take Trip actions, gaining the bonus following the quality in parentheses. If the Trip action fails, the character may drop this weapon in his current square to prevent his opponent from gaining a bonus Trip action against him.

Unreliable (UNR): The action die cost to activate any error made using this weapon decreases by 1 (minimum 0).

Upgrades (UPG): This weapon comes from the factory with one or more upgrades already installed, as listed in parentheses following this quality

Blunt Melee Weapons

Examples of improvised versions of each weapon are provided to offer the Game Control and players some suggestions as to which weapons to use during chaotic fights. Brass Knuckles: This weapon consists of a piece of metal with holes for the wielder's fingers. It's designed to provide a hard surface when punching. An improvised version of this weapon is a set of heavy finger rings.

Club, Light: A light club is less than 12 inches long, lighter than 3 lbs., and easily used with 1 hand. There are countless examples, including such deliberately crafted items as escrima sticks, maces, and police clubs. Improvised versions of this weapon include chair legs, frying pans, pool cues, and small tree branches. Club, Heavy: A heavy club is between 12 and 24 inches long, weighs between 3 and 6 lbs., and requires the use of 2 hands. The classic modern example is the wooden baseball bat. Improvised versions of this weapon include chairs, rifle butts, table legs, and heavy tree branches.

Club, Massive: A massive club is greater than 24 inches long, heavier than 6 lbs., and requires 2 hands to use. Massive clubs are generally reinforced with, or made of, metal - the tetsubo seen in feudal Japan being a prime example. Improvised versions of this weapon include coffee tables, ladders, and small logs. Garrote: This weapon consists of a short cord, often with handles at each end. It is used to improve leverage when choking someone from behind, and grants a +2 gear bonus with all skill checks made as part of a Grapple action. Improvised versions of this weapon include shoelaces and lengths of extension cord. Hammer, Sledge: This common rock-breaking implement is akin to the medieval war-hammer; both are stunningly effective, though slow and cumbersome to use. Improvised versions of this weapon include CD racks, iron crowbars, and table lamps with heavy bases.

Hammer, Tool: This typical household hammer can be found in any hardware store in the world. Improvised versions of this weapon include short lengths of pipe, stone statuettes, and tire irons.

Jitte/Sai: This weapon consists of a set of metal rods featuring 1 or 2 hooks or prongs. It's ideal for catching and disarming opponents. Improvised versions of this weapon include forked branches and garden rakes.

Maul: This weapon is a massive two-handed hammer requiring great strength to lift, much less swing. Improvised versions of this weapon include tall floor lamps with metal bases and traffic signs with head-sized chunks of concrete still attached.

Pick: This two-handed digging tool can also be swung at opponents to devastating effect. Improvised versions of this weapon include large metal draftsman's angles, metal rakes, and rooftop TV antennae.

Punch Gloves: Studs or rivets are sewn into these gloves, increasing the wearer's damage when punching. Improvised versions of this weapon include heavy rope wrappings, possibly with pebbles or screws in-between.

Sap: This weapon consists of a soft leather sack loaded with lead shot. It is typically brought down on the back of an opponent's head, knocking him out cold. When a character uses a sap to make a Pummel action, he may apply the weapon's damage instead of his standard damage. Improvised versions of this weapon include pistol butts, marble busts, and sweat socks stuffed with rolls of quarters.

Shield: A shield may be used to bat, bash, or shove opponents. Improvised versions of this weapon include end tables and trashcan lids.

Stun Gun, Melee: This weapon is highlighted in modern selfdefense classes. It consists of a hand-held plastic case with metal prongs, between which up to 150,000 volts are transferred. This powerful electrical current can overload a target's nervous system, stunning him for a short while. Improvised versions of this weapon include cattle prods and electric cords with stripped insulation.

Tonfa: This club features a handle perpendicular to the main body, allowing it to be held in a position that guards the forearm. Improvised versions include canes, towel racks, and umbrellas.

Exotic Blunt Melee Weapons

Chain, Combo: This two-handed weapon consists of a weighted chain attached to the handle of another weapon (such as a kama or spear), allowing the character to throw the attached weapon up to 10 ft. Once thrown, this weapon may be recovered with 1 half action. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Chain, Weighted: This weapon consists of a light 10- to 15-ft. chain and a set of metal weights used to entangle an opponent's weapon. It is often associated with ninja. An improvised version of this weapon is a pair of horseshoes tied to the ends of a rope.

Chain, Whip: This flexible weapon is similar to a three-section staff, featuring 8-10 short metal bars (each under 1 ft. long) connected by 3-4 links of chain. It is wielded much like a whip, with a single handle at one end. An improvised version of this weapon might consist of links of steel cable.

Flail: This weapon, often also referred to as a "morning star," is a spiked iron ball attached to an iron or wooden rod by a long piece of chain. No improvised weapons mimick this unique weapon.

Nunchaku: This popular martial arts weapon is similar to a flail, featuring two equal-sized lengths of wood that may be used as handles. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Scourge: This weapon consists of loose chains or wires attached to a handle. When whipped at an opponent, a scourge can leave nasty welts or tear apart exposed flesh. An improvised version of this weapon is a handful of 2-ft. barbed wire strands grasped in heavy gloves.

Staff, Long: A long staff ranges from 1 to 2 ft. taller than its wielder. A classic example is the bo stick. Improvised versions of this weapon include flagpoles and long pipes.

Staff, Quarter: A quarterstaff is roughly the same height as its wieldier. Improvised versions of this weapon include broom handles, handy tree branches, skis, and walking sticks.

Staff, Short: A short staff is roughly waist- to chest-high on its wielder. A classic example is the jo stick. Improvised versions of this weapon include ski poles and the remains of a long staff cut in two.

Staff, Three-Section: This weapon is similar to nunchaku, but features a third handle-sized segment in the middle. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Edged Melee Weapons

Axe, Battle: This balanced single- or double-bladed axe often features a metal spike on one end for piercing attacks. The ono is a classic example. An improvised version is a fire axe. Axe, Broad: This heavy single-bladed axe is intended for heavy chopping projects. An improvised version is a lumber axe. Hook: This weapon - similar to a fisherman's hook - can be used to manipulate large objects such as hay bales or meat. With a good hit, it can also lodge under a target's bones. An improvised version of this weapon is a heavy coat hanger. Knife, Escape: This tiny blade is easily hidden and commonly stashed in a place where the owner might be able to grab it when tied up. An escape knife grants a +2 gear bonus with Acrobatics/ Escape checks targeting rope bindings. Improvised versions of this weapon include prison shivs and pieces of broken glass.

Knife, Survival: This is a typical fighting knife and also represents a variety of field weapons like daggers and bayonets. Improvised versions of this weapon include broken bottles and large kitchen knives.

Knife, Switchblade: This stabbing blade is 3 to 6 in. long and common among street thieves. A switchblade possesses the retractable weapon quality, but is illegal in many areas. Improvised versions include ice picks, letter openers, and screwdrivers.

Machete: This weapon is often used to clear underbrush. An improvised version of this weapon is a meat cleaver.

Main-Gauche: This basket-hilted dagger is often used in the off hand while fencing. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Punch Dagger: This blade extends in line with the wielder's arm when held in a clenched fist. An improvised version is a corkscrew.

Scalpel/Straight Razor: This short but extremely sharp hand-tool can easily be wielded as an effective melee weapon. An improvised version is a pocket knife.

Sword, Bastard: This long, narrow 1-handed sword often features a handle designed for easy 2-handed use. A classic example is the katana. An improvised version of this weapon is a lumber saw.

Sword, Broad: This weapon features a slightly shorter and heavier blade than a bastard sword. The scimitar is a class example. An improvised version is the blade of a paper cutter.

Sword, Short: This short-bladed sword is heavily weighted toward the handle and primarily used to pierce and puncture opponents. A classic example is the wakizashi and an improvised version is a garden spade.

Exotic Edged Melee Weapons

Mancatcher: This weapon consists a long pole with a set of pincers or jaws at one end, usually spring-loaded or featuring a series of inward-pointing spikes. It is designed to capture and control an opponent at a safe distance. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Nagamaki: This weapon consists of a heavy curved blade with an extremely long handle. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Ninja-To: This traditional ninja sword comes with a heavy, hollow scabbard that can be used as a breathing tube or light club. It can also be used as an improvised climbing device, granting a +1 gear bonus with Athletics/Climb checks. An improvised version of this weapon is a metal yardstick.

Sickle: This short-bladed farming implement has historically been adapted as the kama, a weapon of grisly effectiveness. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Sword, Great: This massive two-handed sword is reminiscent of an iron beam with a handle and a cutting edge. A classic example is the German zweihander. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Sword, Jagged: This weapon features an irregular blade that savagely shreds an opponent's armor or flesh. Classic examples include the Chinese nine-ring broadsword and the Incan obsidian blade. An improvised version is a long nail-ridden board.

Sword, Long: This narrow-bladed sword is often longer than the wielder is tall. Classic examples include the Scottish claymore and the Japanese no-dachi. An improvised version might be a piece of rebar.

Sword, Razor: This is a straight blade of exceptional sharpness representing any number of weapons independently produced by African, Indian, and Japanese smiths. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Sword, Scholar's: This is a highly flexible Chinese fencing sword, appearing in countless martial arts movies. An improvised versions is a car antennae.

War Fan: This metal folding fan has sharpened edges and may be used to dazzle or slice opponents. Improvised versions of this unique weapon are extremely unlikely.

Hurled Weapons

A character must take 1 half action to ready each grenade, molotov cocktail, or thrown bomb before throwing it. Thus, each attack with one of these weapons that isn't ready - e.g. any grenade not already in hand - requires 2 half actions.

Bomb, Pipe: This homemade device is usually assembled with a quantity of black powder and metal fragments inside a metal pipe. Pipe bombs can be extremely dangerous to build.

Bomb, Propane: This is another homemade explosive device consisting of a widely available propane fuel bottle duct-taped to a highway flare.

Dart: These weapons are common in bars and home "game" rooms. During each half action, a character may make 2 Standard Attacks using darts. His Strength modifier is not applied to damage and any sneak attack damage inflicted with a dart decreases to 1 point per die. Improvised versions of this weapon include short letter openers and meat skewers.

Grenade, Concussion: This grenade relies on explosive power rather than fragmentation effect to inflict injury.

Grenade, Fragmentation: This is the most common style of hand grenade in military service. It uses a small explosive charge to fling shards of metal in all directions.

Grenade, Smoke: This grenade is used for signaling and concealment, though the casing becomes hot when active. For 1 full round following the grenade's use, the casing inflicts 1d6 fire damage upon anything it directly contacts. A smoke grenade may release white, yellow, red, green, or purple smoke (as chosen when requested). For more about smoke spread and dispersal, see page 346.

Grenade, Tear Gas: This grenade is in widespread use by military and civilian law enforcement forces around the world. It is similar to a smoke grenade and is also subject to the rules for gas spread and dispersal, though it releases a cloud of basic blister poison instead of colored gas.

Grenade, Thermite: This grenade has no blasting charge or explosive capability. It is used to destroy rugged equipment, often reducing it to useless slag. This grenade's fire damage cannot decrease by any means - it has its own oxygen supply and continues to burn until it consumes itself. For every round that thermite burns, roll 1d4: with a result of 4, the grenade's fire damage decreases by 1.

Grenade, White Phosphorus: This grenade employs a small explosive charge to disperse burning phosphorus particles in all directions. It can be devastatingly effective against people, having a gruesome tendency to cling to human flesh. A character may not decrease this grenade's damage by dropping and rolling - the phosphorus gel continues to burn as long as it remains in contact with oxygen. Additionally, this grenade's casing burns very hot while releasing its contents, inflicting 1d6 fire damage upon anything it directly contacts.

Molotov Cocktail: This weapon is common on the street, consisting of a glass bottle filled of gasoline with an oily rag for a wick. It shatters when thrown, spraying flaming gasoline over the immediate area.

Exotic Hurled Weapons

Bola: This weapon consists of three weighted balls linked by rope. It is used to trip up or knock out fleeing foes. When a character hits with this weapon, the opponent suffers the weapon's damage and the effects of a Trip action with an Athletics result equal to the attack result. An improvised version of this weapon is a pair of pool balls stuffed in a pair pantyhose.

Boomerang: This is a curved or angled throwing weapon designed to return to the wielder unless its gliding path is obstructed. When an attack with a boomerang misses but doesn't result in an error, the weapon returns to the square from which it was thrown at the end of the current round. If the attacker remains in the square, he may catch the weapon with 1 free action. This rule does not apply to improvised versions of this weapon, which may include hard book covers and laser discs.

Caltrops: These spiky obstacles are dropped on the floor to dissuade or harass close pursuers. Each set is used to attack a square (never a person), and is subject to standard deviation with a miss. Any character entering a square filled with caltrops must make a Reflex save (DC 12) or suffer 1d4 lethal damage and a Speed penalty of 5 ft. until the end of the current scene. Two or more sets of caltrops dropped in the same square have no effect. Picking up all the caltrops in a single square requires 5 full rounds. Improvised versions of this weapon include jacks and d4 gaming dice.

Net: This wide rope mesh is used to catch enemies (and fish). Any opponent hit with a net becomes held. Improvised versions of this weapon include hammocks and tarps.

Shuriken: These sleek and fast throwing stars are omnipresent in classic martial arts movies and nearly synonymous with ninja. During each half action, a character may make 3 Standard Attacks using shuriken. Further, the character's Strength modifier is not applied to damage. Finally, any sneak attack damage inflicted with a shuriken decreases to 1 point per die. Improvised versions of this weapon include CDs and sharp can lids.

Backup Pistols

Backup pistols are scaled-down versions of service pistols, designed for easy concealment under street clothes. Their ammunition capacities are likewise scaled down, however, making them poor sidearms for soldiers, mercenaries, or others who might find themselves in a prolonged firefight.

Glock 26 (Austria): This weapon is often sold to police officers who carry a full-size Glock as a duty sidearm and want a backup gun that's identical in operation. Glock 26 ammunition and parts are compatible with those of the Glock 17 and 18.

Glock 27 (Austria): This weapon is similar to the Glock 26, except that it's ammunition and parts are compatible with the Glock 22 and 24.

Glock 28 (Austria): This weapon is similar to the Glock 26, except that it's ammunition and parts aren't compatible with other Glock pistols. The Glock 28 is designed for commercial sale in regions where military-grade hardware is illegal.

Glock 29 (Austria): This weapon is similar to the Glock 26, except that it's ammunition and parts are compatible with the Glock 20.

Glock 30 (Austria): This weapon is similar to the Glock 26, except that it's ammunition and parts are compatible with the Glock 21.

Glock 29 (Austria): This weapon is similar to the Glock 26, except that it's ammunition and parts are compatible with the Glock 31.

H&K P7 (Germany): This pistol features a unique squeezecocking mechanism, preventing it from firing without a firm hand on the grip.

Kimber Ultra Carry (USA): This weapon is designed for the American concealed carry market.

Makarov PB (Russia): This variant of the Makarov PM is built for covert wetwork. It is used by the Russian Spetznaz and working models are rare outside the Russian intelligence community.

Makarov PM (Russia): This pistol is a successor to the venerable Tokarev TT, loosely based on the Walther PP. The Makarov PM is produced throughout the Soviet Bloc and is still in use as a military and police sidearm throughout Eastern Europe.

SiG-Sauer P239 (Germany/Switzerland): This smaller version of the Sig-Sauer P228 shares most of its parent design's engineering and reliability.

Walther PP/PPK (Germany): The Walther PP (Polizei Pistole) was popular amongst police and civilian shooters for its reliability and ease of concealment. The shorter but mechanically identical PPK attained prominence in the 1960s as the sidearm of a certain famed British secret agent.

Holdout Pistols

Holdout pistols are designed as last-ditch defensive weapons, being eminently concealable but painfully ineffective beyond pointblank range. Some handguns that aren't technically semi-automatic pistols are included in this category for ease of classification.

Beretta 950 Jetfire (Italy): Endorsed by Auric Goldfinger, the Beretta 950 Jetfire is designed to accommodate shooters with small or weak hands. As advertised, it is virtually impossible to jam.

Colt Model 1908 Vest Pocket (USA): Marketed as a discreet gentleman or lady's self-defense weapon, the Colt Model 1908 Vest Pocket is long out of production. It last saw the assembly line in 1941 but can still be found on the collector's and in second-hand markets.

COP, Inc. COP (USA): The Compact Off-duty Police pistol was a powerful but short-lived experiment to produce a small high-caliber backup weapon for law enforcement. Its "pepperbox" design featured a square cluster of 4 barrels, each holding a single bullet.

General Motors Liberator FP-45 (USA): This is the ultimate low-budget last-ditch firearm, made by the Guide Lamp Division of General Motors to the specifications of either the U.S. Army or the OSS (accounts differ). It only had a six-month production run of one million copies that were intended to be dropped over occupied France for use by resistance fighters as assassination weapons, but historical records indicate that it saw the most actual use in the Philippines. The FP-45 is a sheet-metal weapon that must be manually reloaded (the user must poke the empty shell casing out of the barrel). It was packed in paraffin-coated cardboard boxes with 10 shots, a wooden stick for clearing expended casings, and a set of graphic instructions. Most copies of the weapon were destroyed after WWII, making this one of the most value-inflated firearms in the world.

Kel-Tec P3AT (USA): This lightweight semi-automatic pistol is well regarded among civilian shooters.

RSA OTs-21 (Russia): The RSA OTs-21 is built for concealed carry by government agents and private security personnel. Its only sight is a groove along the top of the slide.

Sharps Model 1A (USA): This archaic single-action "pepperbox" was popular as last-ditch protection for gamblers and ladies of dubious moral character in the American Old West. It left production in 1874, but numerous examples and modern reproductions are still in circulation.

Service Pistols

Service pistols are the duty weapons of most military forces and law enforcement officers around the world. They're built for effectiveness over concealment, with bulky utilitarian frames, heavy grips, and high ammunition capacities.

Beretta 92 (Italy): This iconic high-capacity 9mm has been the standard-issue sidearm of the U.S. military since 1985. It is also known as the M9 in American service.

Beretta 93R (Italy): This burst-capable sidearm was developed for counter-terrorist forces. It may accept the standard 15-shot magazines of the Beretta 92.

Colt M1911A1 (USA): This was the standard-issue U.S. military sidearm for most of the 20th century, known for its legendary simplicity and reliability. The M1911A1 has been copied by literally hundreds of manufacturers and features a design unchanged since its introduction almost 100 years ago.

Distinject Model 35 (France): This compressed air pistol is typical of dart pistols used for animal control.

FN Browning High-Power (Belgium): This is the sidearm of choice for Irish separatists. It was designed by John Browning, father of the Colt M1911A1, and it's regarded as equally reliable and timeless. The Browning High-Power is currently in military and law enforcement service throughout western Europe.

FN Five-Seven (Belgium): This ultra-modern armor-piercing high-tech pistol is known for its stunning magazine capacity.

It is, however, illegal for civilian purchase in most nations.

Glock 17/17L (Austria): The Glock 17 was the first widely accepted polymer-frame pistol and one of the best-selling handguns of the 1980s and 1990s. The long-barreled 17L is a competition-tuned variant.

Glock 18 (Austria): This weapon is the Glock 17's selective fire, fully automatic cousin. Consequently, it is restricted in nearly every civilized nation on Earth.

Glock 20 (Austria): This lightweight handgun is chambered for the uncommon 10mm round.

Glock 21 (Austria): This classic-caliber handgun is popular amongst American self-defense enthusiasts.

Glock 22/24 (Austria): This is the most common police sidearm in the United States, chambered for the favored .40 S&W ammunition. The 24 is a rare competition variant.

Glock 31 (Austria): This relatively recent addition to the Glock family features a rare caliber, the .357 Sig.

H&K Mk. 23 (Germany): Also known as the SOCOM (Special Operations COMmand) after the institution that requested its creation, the Mk23 was designed for the American military's special operations community.

H&K USP (Germany): H&K's ultra-reliable police and military sidearm offering features good balance, ambidextrous controls, a wide array of available options and accessories, and a daunting price tag.

Luger P08 (Germany): The Luger P08 served in many central European militaries through both World Wars, but is considered only marginally reliable by modern standards.

Magnum Research Desert Eagle (USA): The Desert Eagle was the first successful design to put a magnum-caliber round in a semi-automatic pistol. It is also the undisputed champion of the "excessively large handgun" market.

Ruger Mark III (USA): This weapon has no noticeable recoil and is easy to pass off as a target pistol. It promises to become the novelist's weapon of choice for fictional assassins in need of accurate silenced handguns.

SiG-Sauer P210 (Germany/Switzerland): The P210 was built for the Swiss military but its status as one of the most accurate "out of the box" handguns in existence has helped it migrate across the globe.

SiG-Sauer P220 (Germany/Switzerland): This smooth, reliable weapon was designed to replace the P210 in Swiss service and is known as "the thinking man's .45."

SiG-Sauer P226 (Germany/Switzerland): This was the first SiG product made in America by the company's SiGArms subsidiary. It is favored by many elite American military units, including the U.S. Navy's SEALs.

SiG-Sauer P229 (Germany/Switzerland): This was the first pistol to be chambered for the .357 SiG cartridge (which was designed to compete with the American .40 S&W round).

Walther P99/Smith & Wesson SW99 (Germany/USA): This is Commander Bond's current weapon of choice.

Backup Revolvers

These smaller cousins of service revolvers are rarely used as primary weapons in the modern era, but are the professional's choice for reliable last-ditch protection.

Colt Detective Special (USA): This shortened version of the Police Positive is built for ease of concealment. It exemplifies the "snub-nose" backup revolver design.

NAA Mini-Revolver (USA): One of the smallest revolvers in existence, the NAA Mini-Revolver comes with a "holster grip;" the gun folds into its own grip like a lockback knife and can be pocketed or clipped to a belt. It can also be concealed in a belt buckle holster that makes the gun look like a decorative engraving.

Smith & Wesson J-Frame Bodyguard (USA): This revolver features a shrouded hammer, allowing for easier draw from concealment without snagging on clothes.

Smith & Wesson J-Frame Chef's Special (USA): This was the first J-frame produced and is still one of the most common backup revolvers in the world.

Smith & Wesson J-Frame LadySmith (USA): This revolver is marketed to female shooters, featuring a carved rosewood grip sized for small hands.

Hunting Revolvers

Hunting revolvers are designed to take down medium to large game. They're typified by low ammunition capacities and brutally high calibers. Most law enforcement and military personnel consider them too heavy and bulky for everyday use. Ruger Super Redhawk (USA): This is the archetypal big-game hunting revolver, a double-action weapon chambered for .44 Magnum ammunition.

Smith & Wesson Model 500 (USA): This revolver brought Smith & Wesson to dominance in the hunting revolver arms race with its new immense caliber, the .500 Magnum.

Smith & Wesson Model 629 (USA): The Model 629 is known to a generation of movie-goers as "the most powerful handgun in the world" ("Do you feel lucky, punk? Well, do ya?"). On the technical end of the spectrum, it was formerly called the Model 29.

Service Revolvers

Service revolvers were the standard sidearms of police through the middle 20th century, and are still common among enthusiasts and civilians seeking home-defense weapons with "point and click" simplicity.

Colt Police Positive (USA): This was the most common lawenforcement sidearm in America through the first half of the 20th century. It left production in the 1970s. gent traits and command thousands of dollars at auction.

Manurhin MR-73 (France): This revolver is favored by French special operations teams. It is considered one of the most accurate revolvers in the world, due in large part to the fact that every copy is assembled by hand.

Taurus Model 608 (USA): This weapon is rarely seen as a duty sidearm, but is popular in the competitive shooting and homedefense markets.

Webley Mk. 6 (UK): This was a common British military sidearm through both World Wars. It first appeared in 1887 as a black powder weapon.

Assault Rifles

Assault rifles are powerful and versatile multi-mode weapons in use with many modern militaries around the world.

C.G. Haenel StG.44 (Germany): The first modern assault rifle, the StG.44 numbered over half a million copies before the fall of its makers, the Nazi Germany war machine.

Colt Commando (USA): Also known as the Model 733, the Colt Commando is one of the shortest M16 variants in existence. It sees use by U.S. and Israeli special ops units.

Colt M16 (USA): The Colt M16 was the result of U.S. Army/Air Force solicitation to produce a lightweight, low-caliber rifle, based on battlefield data showing that most firefights happened within 300 yards. The prototype, known as the AR-15, was combat-tested in Vietnam in 1962, and adopted by the American military as the M16 in 1963. It was plagued by low reliability, however, due to finicky design features, poor maintenance instructions, and Southeast Asian weather.

Colt M16A1 (USA): This rifle replaced the original M16 in 1967, solving many - but not all - of the original design's reliability problems.

Colt M16A2/M16A4 (USA): This M16 variant was limited to three-round bursts only. The recent A4 variant has several new convenience features but is otherwise identical.

Colt M16A3 (USA): The M16A3 combines the A2's modern reliability with full-auto fire.

Colt M4/M4A1 (USA): This compact, burst-capable, carbine version of the M16 was adopted by the U.S. military after Operation Desert Storm and is now widely issued to rear-echelon and front line units. The M4A1 variant is fully automatic.

Colt M4 SOPMOD (USA): The Special Operations Peculiar MODificiation kit was developed to provide American special ops personnel with a readily adaptable M4A1.

Enfield L85A1/L85A2 (UK): This weapon was poorly received by British troops, who complained of serious reliability problems. The later A2 variant has only partially solved these issues. Both versions were issued to front-line troops with a 4×telescopic sight.

FN FAL/FN FAL "Para" (Belgium): The FN FAL is one of the most successful rifle designs of the 20th century, adopted by over 70 national militaries and serving as the front-line weapon for over half the NATO nations during the early decades of the Cold War. The "Para" variant is identical in design but features a shortened barrel and folding stock.

GIAT FAMAS F1/G2 (France): This rifle was developed during the Cold War to replace several aging French small arms models. It became known as "Le Clarion" - "The Bugle" - among French troops due to its quirky appearance. The modernized G2 variant has since replaced the F1 in French service.

H&K G36 (Germany): This polymer-framed weapon is the cur-rent Bundeswehr and Spanish Army standard-issue rifle. It's also becoming popular in police circles. It comes with the buyer's choice of an advanced combat sight or a 6×telescopic sight integral to the carrying handle at no additional cost.

H&K G36C (Germany): This compact variant of the G36 is one of the smallest 5.56mm weapons available. It resembles the UMP submachine gun.

H&K G36K (Germany): This is a short variant of the G36.

H&K G3A3/G3A4 (Germany): The G3A3 was developed as a direct competitor to the FN FAL. Its latest generation left production in 2001, but tens of thousands are still in service around the world. The A4 variant has a telescoping stock. H&K G3SG/1 (Germany): This battlefield sniper's variant of the G3 retains its fully automatic capability. It comes with a bipod and a 6×telescopic sight at no additional cost.

H&K HK33A2/HK33A3 (Germany): This scaled-down version of the G3 is chambered for 5.56mm NATO ammunition.

H&K HK33SG1 (Germany): This accurized sniper's variant of the HK33 comes with a bipod and a 6×telescopic sight at no additional cost.

H&K HK53A2/HK53A3 (Germany): This ultra-compact variant of the G3 resembles an MP5.

NORINCO QBZ-95/QBZ-97 (China): This bullpup assault rifle is currently in limited deployment with PLA special operations, airborne, and marine units, and with troops stationed in the Hong Kong garrison. The QBZ-97 is the rifle's export version, chambered for 5.56mm NATO ammunition.

RSA AK-47/AKS (Russia): Recognizable on sight even to laymen, the AK-47 is the most prolific firearm design ever produced, and the epitome of Russian military technology.

RSA AK-74/AKS-74 (Russia): This is a smaller cartridge version of the AK-47.

RSA AK-101 (Russia): This rifle is intended for the Western export market and chambered for standard NATO rifle caliber.

RSA AK-74U/AKS-74U-UBN (Russia): This radically shortened version of the AK-74 is intended for vehicle crews and special operations troops. Its stubby barrel emits an eyebrow-searing muzzle flash. The rare -UBN variant is used by Spetznaz troops and comes with a removable silencer at no additional cost.

Springfield Armory M14 (USA): This heavy and unwieldy replacement for the venerable M1 Garand was withdrawn from active service by the end of the 1960s.

Steyr AUG (Austria): The first widely-accepted bullpup assault rifle, the Steyr AUG is best known for its science-fiction look. Being modular, the Steyr AUG may be converted to a carbine, 9mm carbine, or squad automatic weapon in 10 minutes. As a SAW, it becomes the AUG Hbar.

Bolt-aCtIon rIfles

Bolt-action rifles feature manual action and are frequently adapted as sniper rifles.

AI AW (UK): The "Arctic Warfare" sniper rifle (known as the L96A1 in British service), is constructed to guarantee reliability in extremely cold weather. It has been adopted by several northern NATO nations.

AI AW Covert (UK): The AI AW is marketed for counter- terrorist teams. Its integral silencer can handle standard or subsonic ammunition. It breaks down for transport in a concealment case that looks like a briefcase and possesses the composite quality. This case comes with the weapon at no additional cost.

AI AW-50 (UK): This is an anti-material variant of the AI AW.

AI AWM (UK): The AI AWM, or "Super Magnum," is chambered for high-power calibers. It sees military and police use, and is often found in the hands of big game hunters.

AMP DSR-1 (Germany): This exceptionally solid and stable weapon is in service with GSG-9 and several other European counter-terrorist agencies. Its interchangeable barrels allow conversion between its listed calibers in 1 minute. Further, an optional barrel with integral suppressor is available for the weapon in 7.62×1mm NATO caliber.

Dan-Inject IM (USA): This archetypal dart rifle is used to bring down dangerous game. Its compressed-air operation grants it the benefit of an integral suppressor.

FN Ultra-Ratio Hecate II (Belgium/France): This rifle is built of high-grade aircraft aluminum to reduce its weight. It's also one of the .50 caliber sniper rifles in the world available with a suppressor. This removable suppressor is destroyed if the weapon fires any non-subsonic ammunition.

FN Ultra-Ratio Mini-Hecate (Belgium/France): This variant rifle combines the Commando II's portability with the Hecate II's range. FN Ultra-Ratio UR Commando II (Belgium/France): This vari-ant features a folding stock, making it a solid choice for covert ops. The weapon can break down to fit in a briefcase provided at no additional cost.

Lee-Enfield SMLE DeLisle Carbine (UK): Only 130 hand-made copies of this weapon were made (though modern reproductions are available in limited quantities). The DeLisle Carbine was used during WWII by American OSS and British commando units for sentry removal during covert missions in occupied Europe, and remained in British service through the 1960s.

Lee-Enfield SMLE Number 1 Mark 3 (UK): This was the universal service rifle for all British troops through the 1960s, with over 5 million copies produced. It earned a reputation for extreme accuracy in WWI trenches. Lee-Enfield SMLE Number 2 (UK): This training version of the No. 1 Mk. 3 is lightweight and chambered for less expensive ammunition.

Lee-Enfield SMLE Number 4 Mark I (UK): This is a sniper version of the No. 1 Mk. 3.

Lee-Enfield SMLE Number 5 (UK): This "Jungle Carbine" is designed less for range than portability.

Mauser Model 1898 (Germany): The Mauser is regarded as one of the most reliable bolt-action rifles in the world (even more than a century after its introduction). German troops carried this weapon through the first half of the 20th century. Mosin-Nagant M1891 (Russia): This rifle was the standard Russian infantry weapon from the time of the Tsars through the beginning of the Cold War. It remains popular throughout the world as a hunting rifle. Remington 700 (USA): This is currently the best-selling bolt-action rifle in the world.

Simonov PTRD (Russia): This rifle is typical of early Soviet design; it's simple, brutal, and unbreakable. The PTRD has enjoyed mixed results against German tanks, but has excelled in Korea as a long-range sniping weapon.

Springfield Armory M1903 (USA): The Springfield Armory M1903 was the first rifle chambered for the .30-06 round. It entered U.S. military service in 1906 and served through the close of World War II.

Weatherby Mark V (USA): This archetypal big-game rifle is used for hunting everything from cape buffalo to lion to light helicopters.

seMI-autoMatIC rIfles

Semi-automatic rifles are capable of highly concentrated fire, making them excellent battlefield weapons.

Barrett M82A1 (USA): This powerful rifle is cinematically known as the "Light Fifty." It's deadly, but also heavy and awkward.

H&K MSG-90 (Germany): This rifle has seen limited German and American service with special operations and counter-terrorist units.

H&K PSG-1 (Germany): This rifle is unpleasantly expensive and heavy, and no longer in production. Its unique "silent bolt closure" feature is helpful in situations when silent loading is critical.

KAC SR25 (USA): This is a semi-automatic marksman's variant of the M16 platform used by U.S. Navy SEAL teams and Israeli Defense Force special operations units. It comes with a remov-able suppressor that doesn't reduce the weapon's muzzle velocity, but also isn't as effective. Each Notice and Search check made to hear this weapon firing suffers a -3 penalty (instead of the standard -10). This penalty increases to -5 if subsonic ammunition is used.

NORINCO KBU-88 (China): This rifle is primarily used by marks-men in regular infantry squads. It may accept the standard 30-shot magazines of the QZB-95.

RSA Dragunov SVD (Russia): This standard Warsaw Pact sniper rifle was designed for regular infantry use, with one "designated marksman" in each squad using it to provide long-range support. The weapon still sees service throughout Soviet-influenced Asia and Europe.

RSA SVU (Russia): This bullpup sniper rifle is intended primarily for law enforcement and special operations.

Ruger 10/22 (USA): This weapon was an "instant classic" in the sport shooting community and is still immensely popular as a learner's gun and small game rifle. It features a unique internal rotary magazine rather than a conventional box magazine.

Ruger Mini-14/Mini-30 (USA): The Mini-14 is a scaled-down development of the Springfield Armory M14 design (just enough to avoid patent infringement). The Mini-30 was a later variation chambered for the 7.62×9mm Russian cartridge.

Simonov SKS (Russia): This rifle was license-built by the Soviet Bloc and its allies during the Cold War, and remained in military service through the 1990s. It is now mostly found in the hands of third-world militias and civilian shooters.

Springfield Armory M1 Garand (USA): This was the first semi-automatic rifle adopted by the U.S. military, with over 4 million copies produced during WWII and another 1.4 million built between 1945 and 1957. It has legendary reliability under even the worst battlefield conditions.

Springfield Armory M21 (USA): This variant of the M14 assault rifle served as the U.S. Army's standard-issue sniper rifle until the M24 replaced it in 1988. A few copies are still in service with select special operations and airborne units.

Break-aCtIon shotGuns

Break-action shotguns must be physically opened for reloading. Further, when firing a break-action shotgun, a character may simul-taneously fire both barrels at his target. He suffers a -4 penalty with his attack check, but if he hits, the target suffers twice the weapon's listed damage.

Browning Superposed (Belgium/USA): This double-barreled "over-under" gun is famed for the beauty of its factory engraving (gold inlay and trigger guards).

Charles Daly Field II Hunter (USA): This archetypal break-action shotgun sells at roughly twice the market value of less famous brand names.

Savage Arms Model 24 (USA): This is a typical "combo gun," with an upper small-caliber rifle barrel and a lower shotgun barrel. Only one of this weapon's barrels may be fired with each attack action.

Winchester Model 21 (USA): This is considered one of the best break-action shotguns of all time - and its price is commensurate with reputation.

puMp-aCtIon shotGuns

A character wielding a pump-action shotgun gains a +1 gear bonus with the first Intimidate check he makes during any combat (only).

Browning BPS Stalker (USA): This weapon is popular for hunting deer and other Medium game. It's one of the few shotguns currently available in 10 gauge and ejects empty shells down rather than to the right, making it ideal for left-handed shooters.

KAC Masterkey (USA): This is a typical "breaching gun" - a shotgun with a shortened barrel and no stock, intended for attachment to an assault rifle. The KAC Masterkey can't be fired by itself - it must be mounted in a rifle's underbarrel upgrade location, at which point it decreases the rifle's recoil by 6.

Remington 870/870P (USA): This is the best-selling shotgun in history, with over 6 million copies made. The Model 870P variant is marketed primarily to law enforcement and available only in 12 gauge.

Truvelo Neostead (South Africa): This shotgun was designed purely as a combat firearm. It feeds from twin top-mounted six-round magazines that can be loaded with different ammunition types (switching between magazines is a free action if the wielder is proficient with the weapon, or a half action if not).

Winchester Model 1897 (USA): The Winchester Model 1897 is the original "trench gun," used to shoot hand grenades out of the air in WWI. It is so efficient in close combat that Germany tried (unsuccessfully) to have shotguns banned from warfare. The 1897 remained in production through the 1950s. This weapon can mount a bayonet, but cannot accept other underbarrel upgrades.

seMI-autoMatIC shotGuns

Semi-automatic shotguns have a higher rate of fire than pump-action models, but they're regularly plagued by jammed and defec-tive shells. In most cases, these weapons make tremendous noise, making them virtually worthless for covert use.

Benelli Super 90 M1 Practical (Italy): This fast-shooting competition gun has an elegantly simple mechanical design and its relatively low weight contributes to higher recoil than that of competing models.

Benelli Super 90 M1 Tactical (Italy): This is a standard police-grade variant of the Super 90.

Benelli M4 Super 90 (Italy): This is a folding-stock variant of the Super 90, in U.S. military service as the M1014.

Browning Auto-5 (USA): This was the first commercially successful auto-loading shotgun. It remained in production for almost a century, until Browning discontinued it in 1999, and set a standard that many competing designs have never matched.

Daewoo USAS-12 (South Korea): This weapon looks like an assault rifle but despite being drum-fed, it isn't built for fully auto-matic fire. Many copies have been successfully modified to rectify this "oversight," however.

Franchi SPAS-12 (Italy): This popular sporting Purpose Assault Shotgun has a militarized appearance. As a half action, a character holding this weapon ready may switch it to function as a pump-action shotgun, granting it the manual action (-2) quality and decreasing its error range by 1.

Franchi SPAS-15 (Italy): This is a law-enforcement variant of the SPAS-12. As a half action, a character holding this weapon ready may switch it to function as a pump-action shotgun, granting it the manual action (-2) quality and decreasing its error range by 1.

Reutech Striker (South Africa): This is one of the very few fully automatic shotguns on the market. It was originally produced by Armsel and exported under the more common "Streetsweeper" name. It features a cylinder - similar to that of a giant revolver - with a spring-loaded rotation mechanism. The spring must be wound after reloading or the gun can't fire. Winding the spring requires 1 full action (or 2 full actions if the character's Strength is lower than 11).

Saiga 12K (Russia): This shotgun is based on the AK-47's internal mechanism and has enjoyed limited export success outside Eastern Europe, where it is popular in sports and law enforcement.

lIGht suBMaChIne Guns

Light submachine guns (SMGs) feature compact designs and may be used one-handed. Like their heavy cousins, these weapons are not common in civilian hands, being sold strictly for law enforce-ment and military applications in most countries.

CZ Skorpion (Czech Republic): This small and reliable SMG is used throughout Eastern Europe by police and criminals alike.

H&K MP5K (Germany): This is a "chopped" variant of the MP5, produced for executive protection and other low-profile missions. It has an extremely short barrel, no stock, and an integral vertical foregrip. An MP5K may be requested with a special briefcase at a cost of 1 upgrade. This case has a trigger built into its handle, allowing the SMG to be fired without being removed from the case (at a -2 gear penalty with each attack check).

H&K MP7A1 (Germany): This weapon has a distinct futuristic look and features armor-defeating capability. It has seen service with German special operations troops.

IMI Micro-Uzi (Israel): This is the smallest Uzi in production.

MAC M10 (USA): This weapon is commonly known as the "Ingram Mac 10." It's one of the best-known products of the now-defunct Military Armaments Corporation and has a blisteringly high rate of fire at 1,100 rounds per minute.

MAC M11 (USA): This is a slightly smaller M10 model that fires 1,600 rounds per minute (or a full magazine in under 2 seconds).

Steyr TMP (Austria): This lightweight polymer-framed weapon is highly controllable for its compact size.

heavy suBMaChIne Guns

Heavy submachine guns are bulky and often awkward, sacrificing sleek single-handed operation for incredible ballistic punch.

FN P90 (Belgium): This SMG is designed for vehicle crews and rear-echelon personnel. It features a fully ambidextrous design and a clear plastic magazine that runs along the top of the weapon, with individual rounds rotating 90 degrees as they're fed into the chamber.

German State Arsenal MP-40 (Germany): Also known as the "Schmeisser," this was the standard German submachine gun during World War II. It is also a modern paramilitary armament, having made its way into the hands of many mercenaries.

H&K MP5A4/MP5A5 (Germany): This is the most popular submachine gun in the world today, in use by countless police and military units. The A5 is a collapsible stock variant.

H&K MP5SD5/MP5SD6 (Germany): The MP5SD5 has an integral silencer and is designed to use standard 9mm ammunition, reducing velocity to subsonic speed before it leaves the muzzle. The SD6 is a collapsible stock variant.

H&K MP5/10 and MP5/40 (Germany): This weapon was developed for American law enforcement but was discontinued in 2000. The FBI currently has most the of the existing MP5/10s, and police forces own most of the MP5/40s.

H&K UMP (Germany): This weapon is an "in" gun for many SWAT teams.

IMI Uzi (Israel): This is the most common submachine gun in the world today (with over 10 million copies in existence). It was also the first modern submachine gun, in use with over 90 nations' militaries. The IMI Uzi is designed for reliability under adverse conditions.

IMI Mini-Uzi (Israel): This is a scaled-down Uzi, trading range for concealability.

RSA Bizon-2 (Russia): This weapon's controls are based on AK-47 to make it familiar to Russian troops. It features a high-capacity helical magazine that runs parallel to the barrel. It's seen service with several Eastern European militaries.

Sten Mk. II/Mk. II(S) (UK): This weapon was produced by British defense industry during World War II. Its magazine well is on the left side of the gun, making the weapon virtually impossible to conceal when loaded. The rare Mk. II(S) variant features an integral silencer for commando operations.

Thompson M1928 (USA): The "Tommy gun" is the archetypal gangster weapon of the Prohibition era, with a distinctive drum magazine.

sQuad autoMatIC Weapons (saWs)

Squad automatic weapons (SAWs) are light machine guns that fire relatively low calibers and are intended for small infantry units.

Browning M1918 BAR (USA): This weapon was the first American SAW (having come into existence well before the term was coined). The Browning is an exceptionally light weapon for its era and remained in American service through the Korean War.

Enfield L86A1 LSW (UK): This is a light Support Weapon variant of the L85 assault rifle. It saw occasional use as a field expedient marksman's weapon due to its longer barrel, but was replaced in British service by the FN Minimi.

FN Minimi/Minimi Para (Belgium): This weapon was called the M249 in American service. It is known for its exceptionally high rate of fire. The Para variant features a shorter barrel and collapsible stock. Both weapons are usually belt-fed (see page 223), with 200-round boxes that clip to the underside of the gun for easy handling. They also accept standard M16-family magazines, but tend to damage them; when M16 magazines are loaded into either weapon, the error range of attacks made with it increase by 1.

NORINCO QJY-88 (China): This weapon saw limited production. It was intended to replace most existing SAWs and GPMGs in Chinese service.

RSA RPK/RPK-74 (Russia): The RPK is a heavy variant of the venerable AK-47 assault rifle. The RPK-74 is the equivalent version of the AK-74. Steyr AUG Hbar (Austria): This is a "heavy barrel" configuration of the Steyr AUG assault rifle.

General purpose MaChIne Guns (GpMGs)

General purpose machine guns (GPMGs) are heavy, high-caliber weapons intended for platoon use (often from a fixed position). Each time an unbraced character makes an attack with a general purpose machine gun, he suffers a -2 penalty.

FN MAG (Belgium): This weapon is loosely based on the Browning BAR's mechanical components. It is ultra-reliable, averaging 26,000 rounds fired between failures, and has become one of the most prevalent GPMGs in the world, used by virtually every member of NATO.

German State Arsenal MG-42 (Germany): The father of all modern GPMG designs, the MG-42 originated early in WWII, when previous German designs proved susceptible to mud and dust. This weapon remains in production in some countries today, re-chambered for 7.62mm NATO ammunition.

RSA PK (Russia): The PK was a mainstay of Soviet, and later Russian, arms exports. It is found virtually everywhere that the Soviet Union ever sold weapons and everywhere another nation copied Soviet products.

Saco M60 (USA): This weapon was the standard American GPMG through most of the Cold War. It was plagued by reliability and overheating problems and was largely replaced in U.S. service by the FN MAG (designated M240). Today, it's seen mostly in third-world militaries and on the black market.

heavy MaChIne Guns (hMGs)

Heavy machine guns (HMGs) are reserved for vehicle use and defense of fixed positions. No character may fire a heavy machine gun that isn't mounted on a tripod or vehicle. Each weapon's weight includes that of an integral tripod for this purpose.

Browning M2hB (USA): The M2hB has seen dozens of official upgrades, having been in service with over 30 nations. It is a slow-firing weapon that may be fired once in Single-Shot mode every other round, or in Burst or Full Auto mode without restriction.

General Electric M134 (USA): The General Electric M134 can fire up to 6,000 bullets a minute and uses an electric motor to drive six rotating barrels to prevent overheating. It is the smallest Gatling-type machine gun in widespread use, usually as a helicopter door gun.

RSA DShK (Russia): This was the first Soviet heavy machine gun, originated as an anti-aircraft weapon. It saw widespread use through the 1960s. The DShK is mounted on a Small wheeled carriage that a character may push at up to 1/2 his Speed (rounded down).

RSA KPV (Russia): This World War II-era machine gun was often assigned to infantry; it was permanently mounted on a low-slung two-wheeled cart incorporating a seat for the user.

explosIves

Explosives include pre-made charges and mines, as well as raw explosives like dynamite and plastic explosive (and the devices used to detonate these materials).

When setting an explosive, a character's attack check result +4 becomes the DC against which any Security/Disable check is made to disarm the device. If someone suffers an error with this check, the character who set the explosive may spend 1 action die to activate it as a critical failure, even when he's not present.

CharGes and MInes

Pre-made charges and mines are used as is. Setting one requires a 1-minute attack check against no target. This attack is made using the Intelligence attribute and the Explosives weapon proficiency. Without a demolitions kit, the character suffers a -4 gear penalty with this check. A threat reduces the time required to 1/2 standard, and a critical hit reduces it to 2 rounds. An error doubles the time required, and a critical miss causes the explosive to immediately detonate with the character as "Ground Zero" of the blast (see page 343).

Charge, Breaching: This is a shaped charge consisting of 1 lb. of plastic explosive and an electrical detonator in an adhesive frame. It is intended for use against doors and windows, allowing assault teams fast entry to fortified locations.Charge, Satchel: This is a canvas bag containing a large quantity of plastic explosive and a time detonator. It's commonly set and slid along the floor to the feet of enemies, or to a wall or door the team needs to bypass.

Mine, Anti-Personnel: This dual-mode detonator can be set for either a 6-lb. tripwire pull or 20 lbs. of pressure. Mine,

Anti-Tank: This is a shaped charge with a pressure detonator set by default to 400 lbs. It is designed to disable - rather than destroy - armored vehicles by wrecking their treads.

Mine, Bouncing Betty: This is an anti-personnel mine that includes a tripwire detonator. When triggered, this mine springs 1d4+2 ft. in the air before exploding, spraying its fragmented contents over the unfortunates who stumbled over it.

Mine, Directional: This is commonly called a "claymore" mine (after the name of the American version). It consists of a curved steel backing plate, a layer of plastic explosive, and several hundred ball bearings. Its folding "feet" are dug into the ground, or it can be stood up anywhere, and when it goes off - either by remote using its electric blasting cap or by the included tripwire detonator - it sprays the ball bearings in one direction, leaving the anyone to its sides or rear unscathed. Directional mines are especially useful in jungle warfare.

raW explosIves

Raw explosives may be used to create a bomb. This requires, at minimum, the following materials.

  • 1 detonator (to trigger the device).
  • 1 blasting cap (to start the explosion).
  • 1 unit of raw explosive (to blow up and inflict damage).

Each detonator/blasting cap pair must either be electric or non-electric, though electric and non-electric pairs may be set to trigger the same explosive.

Constructing a bomb requires a Science/Chemistry check (see page 149). This check uses only the highest Caliber, Complexity DC, and complexity error range of any component used. Further, the Complexity DC increases by 1 per component and unit of raw explosive involved. The Chemistry check determines everything but the cost of building the explosive, which is handled with the cost of each individual component.

Example: Kevin tries to wire his safe house to explode (just in case). He mixes four 50-lb. buckets of ANFO in the basement. Wanting to be able to detonate the device remotely or on the way out the door, he adds a radio detonator and a timer detonator, each with its own blasting cap. The highest Complexity of any component is 22/+1 for the radio detonator. With 2 detona-tors, 2 blasting caps, and 4 units of explosive, the device's total Complexity DC is 30/+1.

A bomb's damage increases with the amount of raw explosive used, but not in a linear fashion. One damage die is added per additional unit (maximum 10 damage dice). Thereafter, the dam-age dice increase by 1 type per additional unit (maximum d12). After that (after 10d12), the damage result increases by +2 per additional unit.

Additionally, a bomb's blast increment increases by 1 square per 3 full additional units.

Example 1: The damage of 1 ANFO unit is 5d6. By using 4 units, Kevin adds 3 damage dice, for a total of 8d6 damage. The 3 extra units also increase the bomb's blast increment from 3 squares to 4.

Example 2: If Kevin were to use 8 buckets of ANFO instead, the total damage would be 10d10 (up to 10d6 for the first 2 addi-tional buckets, up to 10d8 for the third additional, and up to 10d10 for the last one). This bomb's blast increment would also increase from 4 squares to 5 (at 6 units).

Setting a bomb operates like setting a pre-made charge or mine. Finally, a character may always disarm his own explosives without making a skill check.

ANFO: ANFO is short for "Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil," the most common commercial explosive in use today for large-scale demolitions work (such as mining). This is the explosive of choice for rural terrorists due to the widespread availability of ammonium nitrate in farm fertilizer. ANFO may be mixed in solid or liquid ("ANFO slurry") form.

Black Powder: This was the first commercial explosive. It consists of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter in a roughly 12/13/75 mixture.

Blasting Cap, Electric: This blasting cap is triggered by direct current. Whenever a character carrying an electric blasting cap suffers electric damage, the cap must make a Damage save. With failure, it explodes, inflicting its damage with the character as Ground Zero (see Blast, page 343).

Blasting Cap, Non-Electric: This blasting cap is triggered by fire, heat, or shock. Whenever a character carrying a non-electric blast-ing cap suffers fire damage, the cap must make a Damage save. Whenever the character suffers collision or falling damage, the cap must make a Damage save against 1/2 the damage (rounded down). With failure, the cap explodes, inflicting its damage with the character as Ground Zero (see Blast, page 343).

Detonator, Dual-Mode (Non-Electric): Functions as a pressure and tripwire detonator. Detonator, Fuse (Non-Electric): Most fuses burn at about 3 seconds per inch and are marked every 12 in. for hasty measuring. Underwater fuses are sheathed in plastic.

Detonator, Pressure (Non-Electric): This detonator is typically used in land mines. It is pre-set to detonate a non-electric blasting cap when subjected to a specific weight (usually 1-10 lbs. in 1-lb. increments, or 10-500 lbs. in 10-lb. increments).

Detonator, Pressure (Booby Trap, Non-Electric): This detonator is identical to a standard pressure detonator, but may also be set to detonate when a set weight is removed.

Detonator, Radio (Electric): This detonator is triggered by a coded radio signal on a set frequency.

Detonator, Timer (Electric): This detonator may be set for up to 60 hours in 1-second increments.

Detonator, Tripwire (Non-Electric): This detonator may be attached to up to 3 taut hair-thin wires, each up to 50 ft. long. It is triggered by any pressure over 2 lbs.

Detonator, Tripwire (Booby Trap, Non-Electric): This detonator is identical to a standard tripwire detonator, but detonates when a set weight is removed.

Detonating ("Det") Cord: This flexible explosive consists of PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) encased in flexible 1/4-in. plastic cord. It is commonly used to trigger other explosives and may be woven like rope, supporting up to 175 lbs. Dynamite: Dynamite is nitroglycerine absorbed into porous clay. Unfortunately, the nitro tends to "sweat" out of the clay after 5d6 years, increasing the explosive's error range by 4.

Nitroglycerine: This is a highly unstable combination of glycol with nitric and sulfuric acids. Even the slightest bump can set it off while in liquid form.

Plastic Explosive: The best known plastic explosive is C4, or "Semtex." Plastic explosive is stable and flexible, with the consistency of modeling clay. It is created by mixing a high-yield TNT derivative with wax or other plasticiz-ers, and most commonly packaged in 1/4-, 1/2-, and 1-lb. blocks, or on 50-ft. spools (the latter with sticky backing).

Thermite: This fluid is technically an incendiary rather than an explosive, burn-ing at over 5,400° F. Its fire damage cannot be reduced by any means - it contains its own oxy-gen supply and continues to burn until it consumes itself. The fire damage does not decrease as standard; instead, the GC rolls 1d4 at the end of each round, and with a result of 4, the damage decreases by 1 point.

TNT: This is one of the first sta-ble military explosives ever made. It is commonly packaged in 1/4-, 1/2-, and 1-lb. blocks.

flaMethroWers

Personal flamethrowers have smaller arcs of fire than their vehicular cousins, but they're still near-universally feared as some of the most devastating anti-personnel weapons on earth. They dominated the battlefield at their inception during World War I and are now banned by the Geneva Convention and other acts of "fair warfare."

A flamethrower always targets a square (see Defense, page 329); it may never target a person directly. Hitting a target with a flamethrower inflicts the weapon's damage on every other charac-ter and object in the same square. A character possessing the Tactical weapon proficiency may spray flamethrower fuel without igniting it. This allows him to instantly ignite the doused area. Further, anyone in the doused area suffers an amount of stress damage equal to the flamethrower's base damage.

A flamethrower may be filled with gasoline or another flammable liquid instead of napalm. This increases the weapon's error range by 1 and decreases its range increment to 1/2 standard (rounded down to the nearest 5 ft.).

Finally, whenever a character scores a threat against someone carrying or wearing a flamethrower, he may spend 4 action dice to activate the critical against the flamethrower instead of the target. All damage is inflicted to the flamethrower (the target suf-fers no damage from the attack). If the flamethrower is destroyed, it explodes, inflicting explosive damage equal to all combined shots remaining in its tank. This explosion has a 10-ft. blast incre-ment. If a flamethrower explodes when someone is wearing it, that person may not make a Reflex save to reduce the damage.

Hydroar LC T1 M1 (Brazil): This weapon is used primarily by the Brazilian military, but has seen export sales throughout Latin America. It is designed for use with many field-expedient fuels and does not suffer the standard increased error range for non-napalm loads (see page 313).

RSA LPO-50 (Russia): This weapon was used by Cold War combat engineer units against bunkers. China still produces copies for export sales.U.S.

Arsenal M2A1/M9A1 (USA): This was the first flamethrower in American service. It saw action on all fronts of World War II and through the Korean War.

Grenade launChers

Personal grenade launchers act like firearms in most ways and are designed to take out or disperse large numbers of enemy troops and small vehicles with little or no armor. They do not share the firepower nor the size of their vehicular cousins.Though all grenade launchers are grouped together into one weapon category, there are three general varieties, each with its own idiosyncrasies. Some grenade launchers are automatic, bulky affairs that fire at a tremendous rate but aren't generally useful to fast-moving troops; some are stand-alone, intended to be used on their own and generally fired from the shoulder; and some are underbarrel, which may only be used when attached to a rifle. When a grenade launcher is fired directly at a target within the character's line of sight, the Tactical proficiency applies with Dexterity as the key attribute. When a grenade launcher is fired at any target out of the character's line of sight (see Indirect Fire, page 300), the Indirect proficiency applies with Intelligence as the key attribute.All grenade launcher attacks are subject to hang time (see page 300), and any miss with any grenade launcher is subject to devia-tion (see page 346).

Special Note: Grenade launcher ammunition and hurled grenades are not interchangeable.

Colt M203 (USA): This is the standard-issue U.S. underbarrel grenade launcher, but it's also used by many allied nations. Prototypes were used by Navy SEAL teams during the Vietnam War. The M203 may only be mounted on an assault rifle of the Colt M16 family.

Colt M203PI (USA): This is a lightweight "Product Improved" variant of the M203. It comes with a detachable stock that allows it to be used as a standalone grenade launcher; fitting or removing this stock requires 5 minutes. The M203PI may only be mounted on an assault rifle of the Colt M16 family.

Colt M79 (USA): This Vietnam-era standalone grenade launcher resembles an oversized break-action shotgun and is affectionately called the "Thumper." It was retired from U.S. inventories by mid-1980s, but many copies are still available in Third World countries.

CTS TL-1/TL-8 (USA): This single-shot standalone grenade launcher is used by law enforcement agencies. The TL-8 is a six-shot rotary variant.

H&K AG36 (Germany): This underbarrel grenade launcher was developed as a companion to the G36 assault rifle family. It comes with a detachable stock that allows it to be used as a standalone grenade launcher; fitting or removing this stock requires 5 minutes. The AG36 may only be mounted on a Large-sized assault rifle.

Hawk MM-1 (USA): This short-barreled standalone grenade launcher is built like a giant revolver. Grenade types may be mixed in this weapon, though their sequence must be set. Firing the grenades out of sequence requires the wielder to spend 1 half action spinning the weapon's ammunition cylinder.

Milkor MGL Mk. I (South Africa): This six-shot standalone grenade launcher is built on a scaled-up blueprint of the Reutech (then Armsel) Striker shotgun. Grenade types may be mixed in this weapon, though their sequence must be set. Firing the grenades out of sequence requires the wielder to spend 1 half action spin-ning the weapon's revolver-like ammunition cylinder.

RSA AGS-17 (Russia): This automatic grenade launcher is designed for use against infantry targets. Its rate of fire is superior to that of its Western counterparts.

RSA BS-1 (Russia): This underbarrel grenade launcher is rare outside Russian special operations forces. It fires a special low-velocity 30mm HEAT round, granting it the benefits of the suppressor upgrade (see page 319). The BS-1 may only be mounted on an RSA AKS-74U-UBN assault rifle.

RSA GP-25 (Russia): This was the most common Soviet-era underbarrel grenade launcher. It may only be mounted on an assault rifle from the RSA AK-47 family.

Saco Mk. 19 (USA): This automatic grenade launcher saw widespread use as a truck-mounted infantry support weapon, particularly in urban areas.

MIssIle launChers

Personal missile launchers have much lower range and fewer ammunition options than their vehicular cousins. The line occa-sionally blurs, however, as seen with the RSA SA-7 (see below). Also, like attacks made with a vehicular missile launcher, each Standard Attack with a personal missile launcher requires 1 full action. Further, any miss with a missile launcher is subject to deviation (see page 346), and all missile launcher attacks are subject to hang time (see page 300).

Euromissile MILAN (France/Germany/UK): This is an archetypal wire-guided anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) launcher.

Raytheon FIM-92 (USA): This weapon is also known as the "Stinger." It's been the standard American man-portable surface-to-air (SAM) missile launcher since 1982.

Raytheon Javelin (USA): This infrared-guided anti-tank mis-sile launcher was one of the first fire-and-forget ATGM designs. It consists of two components - a reusable guidance/control unit and a disposable launch tube containing a single missile. The control unit incorporates night-vision optics with no magnification (see page 317).

RSA SA-7 (Russia): This is the most common shoulder-launched surface-to-air missile (SAM) launcher in the world. It is often mounted on light combat vehicles in clusters of four, six, or eight.

Mortars

All mortars must be used outdoors, or in very large indoor areas, as they lob an explosive charge in a high arc toward an enemy. Line of sight to the target isn't required, as all mortar attacks are indirect (see page 300). Also, when firing a mortar, a character's range penalty is -3 per increment beyond the first. Further, any miss with a mortar is subject to deviation (see page 346), and all deviation distances are doubled.Finally, all mortar attacks are subject to hang time (see page 300).

Royal Ordnance L-16A2 (UK): This mortar is in use by over 30 countries, including most NATO nations. It breaks down into 3 component parts: a tube weighing 35 lbs., a base plate weighing 25.5 lbs., and a bipod weighing 27 lbs. Assembly and disassembly each takes 10 half actions. This weapon may not be fired when disassembled. Soltam C-03 (Israel): This mortar is typical of "commando" models around the world. It's small, lightweight, and designed to be air-dropped with paratroops or light infantry.

Watervliet Arsenal M224 (USA): This is the standard American light mortar. It breaks down into 3 component parts: a tube weigh-ing 14.4 lbs., a base plate weighing 14.4 lbs., and a bipod weighing 15.2 lbs. Assembly and disassembly each take 6 half actions. This weapon may not be fired when disassembled.

roCket launChers

Personal rocket launchers are man-portable, shoulder-fired weapons with little recoil. They do produce a large amount of backblast, however - exhaust from the rear of the launcher that can give away the user's position. Each Standard Attack with a rocket launcher requires 1 full action.When firing a rocket launcher, a character's range penalty is -3 per increment beyond the first. Further, any miss with a rocket launcher is subject to deviation (see page 346), and all deviation distance is doubled.Finally, all rocket launcher attacks are subject to hang time (see page 300).

Blacker PIAT (UK): Short for "Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank," the PIAT's unique design eliminates backblast, making it ideal for urban fighting.

Bofors AT4/AT4 CS (Sweden): This weapon was produced by Saab Bofors Dynamics (formerly Bofors Anti-Armor Systems). Its U.S. designation is the M136 AT4. The CS (Confined Space) variant features no backblast.

Bofors Carl Gustav (Sweden): This rocket launcher is rug-ged enough to be air-dropped with a parachutist or submerged with a combat swimmer. When using this weapon, the character may spend 1 additional half action to set a loaded HE rocket for airburst, and then target any 5-ft. square within the weapon's maximum range. With a hit, the DC of any Reflex save made to avoid the attack's damage increases by 5.

RSA RPG-7 (Russia): This is one of the most common rocket launchers in existence, known for its simplicity and affordability. It is a favorite of legitimate and outlaw militaries alike.

Talley M72 LAW (USA): This telescoping, disposable launch tube was popular throughout the middle of the Cold War, but has since retired from front-line NATO service. When collapsed, the Talley's Size becomes Medium, and readying it from this state requires 1 half action.

U.S. Arsenal M9A1 (USA): This weapon was developed soon after America entered WWII. It was quickly nicknamed the "bazooka" after the unique brass horn of comedian Bob Burns.

Weapon upGrades

Weapon upgrades may be acquired as Possessions or during the Intel Phase with upgrades, as shown on Table 4.60: Weapon Upgrades (see page 272).

After the Intel Phase, they may be installed using the appropriate Modify check and the information on Table 4.60.

Further, each firearm has 3 upgrade locations - optics, rail, and underbarrel - and may accept 1 upgrade in a set number of these points determined by its weapon category, as shown on Table: Upgrade Locations. Some weapons possess the non-standard upgrade locations quality, deviating from the norm for their weapon categories.

Optics upgrades are always mounted on the top of the gun, replacing the firearm's "iron sights." Rail upgrades clamp to mounting points on the gun's frame or barrel, while underbarrel upgrades are attached along the underside of the gun's barrel (unless otherwise specified, these two upgrade types are mutually exclusive, as shown on Table: Upgrade Locations).

Finally, a firearm may accept any number of upgrades with no specific location.Weapon upgrades have the following effects.

Special Note: Explosives, grenade launchers, missile launchers, and rocket launchers cannot receive any of the weapon upgrades in this book.

Advanced Combat Sight: This accessory combines the benefits of a red dot sight and a 4×telescopic sight.

Barrel, Extended: This longer replacement barrel increases accuracy but adds weight and makes the weapon more noticeable. The firearm's range increment increases by 5 ft. but the DCs of Notice and Search checks made to detect it decrease by 2.

Barrel, Heavy: This replacement barrel increases a rifle's range increment by 10% (rounded to the nearest 5 ft.), decreases its Recoil by 1, and increases its weight by 15% (rounded up).

Barrel, Ported: This replacement barrel has large grooves or holes in the upper side of its tip, through which muzzle blast is vented. The firearm's Recoil decreases by 3.

Barrel, Threaded: This replacement barrel is machined with screw threads on its tip, granting the firearm the threaded barrel quality.

Bayonet Lug: This upgrade installs a bayonet mount. Attaching or removing the bayonet requires 1 half action. The user suffers a -1 gear penalty with his attack check when the bayonet is attached. Bipod: If the wielder of a weapon with this upgrade is prone or may otherwise lay the bipod on a flat surface, he may Brace as a free action (see page 354).

Ceramic: The weapon gains the composite quality.

Clockwork Action: This upgrade completely tears down and examines the gun's inner workings, reconditioning and replacing any parts as necessary, and treating the weapon for durability and resilience. Whenever an attack with the weapon results in an error, the wielder rolls 1d6: with an even result, the error may not be activated as a critical failure.

Concealment Case: This briefcase, guitar case, or other con-tainer is fitted to include a holster. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 full action. An external inspection of this case only spots the upgrade if the corresponding Notice or Search check results in a critical success.

Custom Grip: The weapon's grip is fitted to a mold of the wielder's hand, granting him a +1 gear bonus with all aimed attack checks made with the weapon. It also increases his Initiative Count by 2 the first time he readies the weapon in each combat (only). Anyone else who tries to use the weapon suffers a -2 gear penalty with his attack checks.

Custom Handle: The weapon's hilt or handle is fitted to a mold of the wielder's hand, granting him a +1 gear bonus with all skill checks made to resist Disarm actions targeting the weapon. This upgrade also increases the wielder's Initiative Count by 2 the first time he readies the weapon during each combat (only). Anyone else who tries to use the weapon suffers a -1 gear penalty with all attack checks.

Day/Night Sight: This accessory combines the benefits of a night vision sight and a telescopic sight. Switching between night vision and daytime modes involves swapping eyepieces, which requires 2 half actions.

Deadly Precision: Once per combat, this upgrade decreases the action die cost of activating any threat scored with the weapon by 1 (minimum 0). When this upgrade is applied to a Caliber III-V weapon pick, this ability may be used up to twice per combat.

Detailing Upgrade: The weapon gains the ornamented quality.

Duckbill: This wedge-shaped device is attached to a shotgun's muzzle and spreads shot ammunition in a flat fan-shaped pat-tern rather than the standard cloud. When a shotgun with this upgrade is used to make an attack with shot, flechette, or rock salt ammunition, the target loses his dodge bonus to Defense. If any other type of ammunition is fired through the shotgun, the duck-bill catastrophically interferes with it - the attack automatically fails and the duckbill is destroyed. Further, the gun must make a damage save against the ammunition's maximum possible damage result.

Ergonomic Stock: This upgrade is usually seen only on sniper rifles and competition shotguns. It requires precise measurements of the intended wielder's upper body to ensure that the gun perfectly matches his shooting posture. It grants any 1 character a +1 bonus with all aimed attack checks made using the firearm and reduces its Recoil by 3 when he fires it. Anyone else who tries to use the weapon suffers a -1 gear penalty with his attack checks.

Extra Rail: The firearm gains 1 additional rail upgrade location and the appropriate non-standard upgrade location quality. No firearm may possess more than 3 combined rail and underbarrel upgrade locations.

Fine Balance: The weapon loses the quirky quality.

Full Auto Upgrade: This upgrade converts the weapon from semi-automatic to full-auto capability, allowing it to fire in Burst and Full Auto modes, but increasing its error range by 2.

Full Auto Adjustment: This "upgrade" allows the weapon to fire in Burst and Full Auto modes, but a lack of replacement parts increases the risk of using it. The weapon's error range increases by 3 and it loses the dependable quality (if it had it to begin with). This upgrade is also highly illegal, reducing the GC's action die cost to trigger a Wanted event by 1 if the police hear of the weapon's conversion (see page 404).

Holster, Concealed: This holster is worn on the belt or in the small of the back. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 half action but decreases the wielder's Initiative Count by 2. Further, the DCs of Notice and Search checks made to detect a weapon in this holster increase by 2.

Holster, Holdout: This holster may be a fake wallet, ankle strap, or other highly concealable device. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 full action. Further, the DCs of Notice and Search checks made to detect a weapon in this holster increase by 4.

Holster, Tactical: This holster is worn on the thigh, with a strap attaching it to the belt. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 half action. Further, it includes a strap or snap that imposes a -4 pen-alty with any skill check made to remove the weapon without the wearer's consent.

Holster, Shoulder: This holster uses a set of straps around both of the wearer's shoulders to stash the gun under one armpit, with pouches for two magazines or speedloaders under the opposite armpit to balance the weight. Readying a weapon from this holster requires 1 half action. Further, the DCs of Notice and Search checks made to find a weapon in this holster increase by 1.

Table: Hot-load and subsonic ammunition
Caliber Hot-Load Dmg Subsonic Dmg
Pistol Calibers*
4.6×30mm 2d4+2 (AP 5) 1d6 (AP 2)
5.7×28mm 1d12 (AP 5) 1d6+1 (AP 2)
.25 ACP 1d6+1 N/A*
.32 ACP 1d8 (AP 1) N/A*
.357 SIG 2d6+2 2d4+1
.380 ACP 1d8+2 N/A*
9×18mm Makarov 1d8+2 N/A*
9×18mm Improved 2d6 (AP 1) 1d8+1
9mmP 1d12 (AP 1) 1d10
.38 Super 1d12 1d10
.40 S&W 2d6 (AP 1) 1d10+1
10mm ACP 2d6+2 (AP 2) 1d12
.45 ACP 1d12 (AP 2) N/A**
.50 Action Express 3d6+2 (AP 3) 4d4

 

Revolver Calibers*

.17 HMR 2d4+1 (AP 3) 1d6
.22 LR 1d6+1 N/A**
.22 Magnum 2d4+1 (AP 3) 1d4+2
.32 S&W 1d6+1 N/A**
.357 Magnum 3d4+2 (AP 1) 3d4
.38 Special 1d10 (AP 1) N/A**
.41 Magnum 3d4+1 (AP 1) 1d12
.44 Magnum 3d4+2 (AP 2) 1d12+1
.44-40 2d6+2 (AP 2) 3d4
.45 Long Colt 1d12 N/A**
.454 Casull 3d6+3 (AP 3) 2d8
.455 British Service 1d10 N/A**
.500 Magnum 4d4+2 (AP 4) 2d8+1
* Any ammunition not listed on this table cannot be hot-loaded or made subsonic.
** A character may not apply the subsonic upgrade to this ammunition, as it is naturally subsonic.

Hot Load Upgrade: This upgrade increases the gunpowder in 1 stockpile of full metal jacket (FMJ), frangible, or jack-eted hollow point (JHP) bullets, increasing the damage of each attack made with them as shown on Table: Hot-Load and Subsonic Ammunition. When a weapon fires hot- loaded ammunition, its error range increases by 1.

Laser Sight, Standard: This accesso-ry projects a visible-frequency laser beam - usually red - parallel to the weapon's barrel. It grants a +2 gear bonus with attack checks made against any target within 50 ft. and a +1 gear bonus with Threaten actions made against targets within the same range, provided the target can see the laser's dot.

Laser Sight, Infrared: This accessory operates like a stan-dard laser sight but projects an infrared dot that cannot be seen by the naked eye, visible only with night-vision equipment. This accessory does not grant a gear bonus with Threaten actions.

Laser Sight, Multi-Mode: This accessory combines a standard laser sight and an IR laser sight in one housing. Switching between modes requires 1 free action.

Muzzle Brake, Removable: This accessory attaches to the tip of a firearm's barrel, directing part of the muzzle blast upward to reduce the weapon's Recoil by 2. It may be removed with 1 full action.

Night Vision Sight: Night vision - aka "starlight" - optics amplify existing low levels of visible and near-infrared light and convert them to a monochrome visual image. In twilight or brighter lighting conditions, a night vision sight is useless as the electronics shut down to prevent damage. So long as at least dim light is available, this accessory negates the vision penalties applied by low ambient light except 'None' (see page 350). If the accessory also offers magnification, it operates like an equivalent telescopic sight.

Optic Mount (Bows Only): The bow gains any 1 firearm optic upgrade.

Precision Upgrade I-III: These upgrades improve the weapon's accuracy by competitive degrees. Each upgrade has the following effects.

  • If the weapon possesses the inaccurate (-2 or more) quality, its attack check penalty decreases by 1.
  • If the weapon possesses the inaccurate (-1) quality, it loses it.
  • If the weapon possesses the superior accuracy quality, it loses it and gains the accurized quality.
  • If the weapon possesses neither the inaccurate or superior accuracy qualities, it gains the accurized quality.

Practice Weapon: This "upgrade" replaces the weapon with a wooden or blunted version that inflicts subdual damage equal to the weapon's standard damage.

Prongs: The weapon gains the hook (+1) quality, or its existing hook quality increases by +1 (maximum +4). When this upgrade is gained with a Caliber III-V weapon pick, the weapon gains the hook (+2) quality, or its existing hook quality increases by +2 (maximum +4).

Razor Sharp: The weapon gains the keen (4) quality, or its exist-ing keen quality increases by 4. When this upgrade is gained with a Caliber III-IV weapon pick, the weapon gains the keen (8) quality, or its existing keen quality increases by 8. When this upgrade is gained with a Caliber V weapon pick, the weapon gains the keen (12) quality, or its existing keen quality increases by 12.

Recoil Pad: This thick rubber pad attaches to the butt of a longarm, decreasing the weapon's Recoil by 1.

Red Dot Sight: This accessory projects an illuminated red dot onto a piece of glass or plastic, superimposing it over the shooter's field of vision as he looks through the sight. It visually resembles a laser sight to the shooter, but no actual dot is projected down-range. A red dot sight grants a +1 gear bonus with attack checks made within the gun's first 5 range increments.

Retractable: This upgrade allows the weapon to be folded down to 1 Size category smaller than standard. Folding or unfolding the weapon requires 1 half action.

Reworked Action I-III: These upgrades improve the weapon's internal mechanisms. Each upgrade has the following effects.

  • If the weapon possesses the unreliable quality, it loses it.
  • If the weapon possesses the dependable quality, it loses it and its error range decreases by 1.
  • If the weapon possesses neither the unreliable or dependable qualities, it gains the dependable quality.

Rugged: This upgrade improves the gun's durability, removing the fragile quality, or adding the rugged quality to a weapon with-out the fragile quality (but not both).

Sawed-Off: A shotgun may be cut down to one of the following 3 lengths.

  • Coach Gun (6-12 in.): The weapon's range increment decreases by 10 ft. and it gains the discreet and inaccurate (-1) qualities (or its inaccurate quality increases by 1 if it already possesses it).
  • Down to the Nub (6 in. - standard minimum): The weapon's range increment decreases to 1/2 standard (rounded down, minimum 15 ft.), its Size becomes Tiny, its weight decreases by 40% (rounded down), and it gains the inaccurate (-3) quality (or its inaccurate quality increases by 3 if it already possesses it).
  • Nebraska (less than 6 in. of barrel and a pistol grip): The weapon's Recoil is doubled, its range increment decreases to 5 ft., its Size becomes Diminutive, its weight decreases by 60% (rounded down), and it gains the inaccurate (-6) quality (or its inaccurate quality increases by 6 if it already possesses it).

Scope Mount: The firearm gains 1 additional optic upgrade loca-tion and the appropriate non-standard upgrade location quality.

Sheath, Concealed: This sheath is worn on the belt or in the small of the back. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 half action but decreases the wielder's Initiative Count by 2. Further, the DCs of Notice and Search checks made to detect a weapon in this sheath increase by 2.

Sheath, Holdout: This sheath may be a fake wallet, ankle strap, or other highly concealable device. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 full action. Further, the DCs of Notice and Search checks made to detect a weapon in this sheath increase by 4.

Sling, Patrol: This item allows the wielder to hang a weapon from his shoulder. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 half action.

Sling, Tactical: This item holds a firearm across the wearer's body, keeping its grip within a foot of his normal hand position. Readying a weapon from it requires 1 half action, and increases the wielder's Initiative Count by 4 the first time he readies the weapon during each combat (only).

Speedloader: This cylindrical device holds 1 full reload, allowing a revolver's wielder to fully Reload his weapon with 1 half action. Refilling the speedloader takes as long as reloading a standard revolver (see page 359).

Stock Upgrade, Fixed: The firearm loses the collapsible stock quality and its Recoil decreases by 1.

Stock Upgrade, Folding: The firearm gains the collapsible stock quality and its Recoil increases by 1.

Stock Upgrade, Synthetic: The firearm's weight decreases by 20% (rounded up), but its Recoil increases by 10% (rounded up, minimum 1).

Subsonic Upgrade: This upgrade decreases the gunpowder in 1 stockpile of full metal jacket (FMJ), frangible, or jacketed hollow point (JHP) bullets, decreasing the damage of each attack made with them as shown on Table: Hot-Load and Subsonic Ammunition. When a weapon fires subsonic ammu-nition, the shot is more difficult to hear - each Notice and Search check made to hear it suffers a -5 penalty.

Suppressor: Each Notice and Search check made to hear this weapon firing suffers a -10 penalty. This penalty increases to -15 if subsonic ammunition is used. When the suppressor is attached, the DCs of Notice and Search checks made to find the weapon decrease by 3.

Tactical Flashlight: This accessory projects light out to 20 ft. in front of the firearm. Switching the light on and off requires 1 free action.

Telescopic Sight: When a character makes an aimed shot using a telescopic sight, he ignores the penalties for one or more range increments, based on the accessory's magnification, as follows.

  • 1.5×-4×: Increment 2 only
  • 4.1×-8×: Increments 2 and 4
  • 8.1×-16×: Increments 3, 5, and 7
  • 16.1+×: Increments 4, 6, 8, and 10

Thermal Sight: This accessory literally "sees heat." It negates all vision penalties for darkness with regard to people, creatures, and objects warmer than the surrounding scenery (see page 354), but only when looking at sources of heat - ambient or otherwise - between 60° and 120° (outside this range, everything appears cold blue or white hot). Further, a thermal sight cannot register warmth through heat-shielded scenery or through any scenery over 2 inches thick. Finally, if the accessory also offers magnification, it operates like an equivalent telescopic sight.

Tripod: As a half action, the wielder of a weapon with this upgrade may assume a position from which he is always considered Braced (see page 354). He continues to benefit from the effects of the Brace action unless either he or the weapon moves.

Vertical Foregrip: This accessory offers a shooter more leverage than a standard rifle or SMG foregrip, reducing the weapon's Recoil by 1.

Wicked: The weapon gains the bleed quality.

aMMunItIon

Ammunition comes in three forms, as follows.

  • Arrows and bolts are used in bows and crossbows, respectively. They share identical traits but aren't interchangeable between weapons.
  • Bullets are used in pistols, revolvers, rifles, submachine guns, and machine guns. They are interchangeable between weapons of the same caliber only.
  • Shells are used in shotguns. They are interchangeable between weapons of the same gauge only. All ammunition of the same name shares the same rules (e.g. non-lethal bullets and shells operate the same in terms of game mechanics).

aMMunItIon Codes and stoCkpIles

As seen on many weapon tables, ammunition codes consists of 2 numbers separated by a letter - "M" for self-contained remov-able magazine, "S" for an internal supply of shots, "B" for a belt, and "D" for a removable drum. The number before the letter is the number of shots the weapon can hold and the number after the letter is the number of reloads automatically supplied with the weapon (e.g. 15M4 indicates that the gun comes with 4 fully loaded 15-shot magazines). When a weapon's ammo code lists two or more options, the character may gain only 1 of them with each weapon pick.

Example: Kevin requests a Colt M16A1, which has two ammo codes - 20M8 and 30M5. Kevin chooses the weapon model that has a 30-round magazine and comes with 5 magazines.

The full complement of ammo supplied when it's chosen is also called the weapon's ammunition stockpile. Several rules and upgrades change a weapon's full ammo stockpile or offer addi-tional stockpiles to the character.

Example: Following the previous example, Kevin uses 1 of his upgrades to gain 1 additional stockpile of ammo (another five 30-round magazines) and the remaining 2 upgrades to convert both of his ammo stockpiles for the weapon to armor-piercing ammo.

startInG aMMunItIon

Ammunition is always gained in stockpiles. Unless otherwise specified, when a character requests a weapon, it comes with 1 full stockpile of any 1 "first stockpile" ammunition as noted on Table 4.62: Ammunition (see page 274), or on the table for the specific weapon gained.

Example 1: A pistol comes with 1 stockpile of blank, full metal jacket (FMJ), or non-lethal bullets (of the character's choice).

Example 2: A Carl Gustav rocket launcher comes with 1 stockpile of high explosive (HE), high explosive anti-tank (HEAT), illumination, or smoke rockets.

During the Intel Phase, character may gain additional ammuni-tion stockpiles by paying the listed upgrade or Common Item cost for each stockpile desired.

Example 1: Following the first example above, 1 additional stockpile of full metal jacket (FMJ) bullets costs 1 upgrade or 3 Common Items. A character might also gain 2 stockpiles of armor-piercing bullets at a total additional cost of 4 upgrades or 12 Common Items.

Example 2: Following the second example above, 1 additional stockpile of high explosive (HE) rockets costs 1 upgrade (as ammu-nition for this weapon can't be gained with Common Items). A character might also gain 3 additional stockpiles of illumination rockets at a total additional cost of 3 upgrades.

Further, a character may convert the ammunition stockpile that comes with a weapon into any other ammunition by paying the desired ammunition type's upgrade cost minus 1, or Common Item cost minus 3.

Example: Following the Example 1 chain above, a character might convert his pistol's first ammo stockpile to armor-piercing bullets at a cost of 1 upgrade or 3 Common Items. Alternately, he could convert it to armor-piercing incendiary bullets at a cost of 3 upgrades or 9 Common Items.

Finally, as with all gear, street values are provided for those characters who need to find ammunition in the field.

aMMunItIon desCrIptIons

Ammunition has the following effects.

Armor-Piercing (AP): This ammunition grants the armor-piercing (3) quality to each attack made with it. If the attack already pos-sesses the armor-piercing quality, this ammunition increases it by 2 (e.g. an attack with the armor-piercing (4) quality becomes an attack with the armor-piercing (6) quality).

Armor-Piercing Discarding Sabot (APDS): This ammunition consists of a small, dense dart (the penetrator) surrounded by a light-weight jacket (the sabot). When the weapon is fired, the sabot falls away within a few dozen yards of the muzzle, leaving the penetrator to travel on at extremely high velocity. APDS ammunition grants the armor-piercing quality, as listed in parentheses following its listing.

Armor-Piercing Incendiary (API): This ammunition combines an armor-piercing tip with a delayed-action fuse and a small amount of incendiary explosive. When an attack with an API bullet scores a critical hit, the attacker may spend 1 additional action die to convert the attack's damage type from lethal damage to fire damage.

Beehive: This ammunition fires dozens or hundreds of small projectiles and is brutally effective against personnel. Beehive ammunition operates like a directional mine, expanding in a cone from the weapon's location (see page 312).

Blank: This ammunition involves no projectile - it's nothing but noise and muzzle flash. It can still be dangerous at close range, however. A blank inflicts full damage against a target in the same square, 1/2 damage against an adjacent target (rounded down), 1/4 damage against a target within 10 ft. (rounded down), and no damage at greater ranges. Further, an attack with blank ammuni-tion always loses the armor-piercing quality.

Chemical: This ammunition releases 1 sample of a loaded contagion upon impact. This contagion spreads like gas (see Gas Spread and Dispersal, page 346). The contagion must be acquired separately. Chemical ammunition is generally a nation-state and terrorist plaything, and street value is often subject to the seller's whim.

Cluster: This ammunition releases hundreds of small grenade-sized bomblets at a predetermined height above the target, spreading devastation over a wide area. Each square within the listed "blast radius" from the impact point is attacked by 1 fragmentation grenade with an attack bonus equal to that of the heavy weapon attack. Further, even if a character makes a success-ful Reflex save to reduce the damage in his square, the GC rolls 1d20. With a result of 8 or less, the character winds up leaping into another square hit by a grenade, in which case he may not make a second Reflex save.

Flash-Bang: This ammunition operates like a flash-bang hand grenade (see page 252).

Flechette: This ammunition contains several dozen small metal darts, which spread out when the weapon is fired. When a character makes an attack with flechette ammunition, any dodge bonuses and defense bonuses his target gains from Size are each decreased to 1/2 standard (rounded down).

Full Metal Jacket (FMJ): This ammunition - also known as "ball" - is the default for target practice and military use, and has no special rules.

Frangible: This ammunition is designed not to pierce solid surfaces, such as schoolhouse walls or aircraft bulkheads. When a character makes an attack with a frangible bullet, the weapon's maximum range is shortened by 2 increments and the damage reduction of anything hit is doubled. Further, an attack with frangible ammunition always loses the armor-piercing quality.

Gas: This ammunition is used during riots and barricaded sus-pect situations. When it impacts, the target square is filled with 1 sample of basic blister contagion, except that all phases inflict the blinded condition (see page 340).High Explosive (HE): This simple ammunition consists of an explosive charge in a metal shell. Casing fragments are flung in every direction upon impact, augmenting the attack's damage. Alternately, it may be a fragmentation warhead that inflicts dam-age by flinging shrapnel, rather than by direct explosive force.

High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT): This ammunition is an explo-sive shaped charge that directs most of its force in one direction. It possesses superior armor penetration, but its secondary blast is far less effective than a HE round of the same size. This ammuni-tion includes similar types such as High Explosive Dual Purpose (HEDP) and High Explosive Squash Head (HESH).

Illumination: Illumination ammunition inflicts no damage; instead, its "damage result" is the number of rounds it burns in the air and its "blast increment" is the radius it lights up. Within this area, it is considered day for the purpose of determining visual range (see page 350). Should an attack be made with this ammunition, the weapon's range increment decreases to 1/2 standard (rounded down), and with a hit, the target suffers fire damage equal to twice the ammunition's burn duration. This damage possesses the armor-piercing (30) quality.

Jacketed Hollow-Point (JHP): This ammunition is similar to full metal jacket, except that it contains a conical cavity in the nose that "mushrooms" in a target, transferring greater kinetic energy. A successful attack with a JHP bullet inflicts +1d4 damage, but doubles the target's damage reduction. Further, an attack with JHP ammunition always loses the armor-piercing quality.

Low-Explosive: This ammunition's damage is explosive (see page 336), with a blast increment defined by its blast quality. It is not powerful enough to cause a target to fail more than 1 Damage save, however, even if the target fails by 10 or more (see page 224 for more information about Damage saves).

Match Grade: This ammunition is used for competition targeting and precision sniping. It is factory tested to provide exact ballistic data that a shooter may use to compute each shot's destination. When a character knows the range to his target to a precision of +/-30 ft., he may take 1 full action to calculate the shot. Thereafter, if he makes an aimed and braced Standard Attack against the tar-get before the range changes by more than 30 ft., he gains a bonus with his attack check equal to his Wisdom modifier (if positive).

Non-Lethal: This ammunition consists of rubber-coated steel balls, a single large "beanbag," or powdered metal compacted into a bullet. When this ammunition impacts a target, it applies all the concussive force of the attack with little penetration trauma. This ammunition is especially useful on airplanes and is employed extensively by Air Marshals. Non-lethal ammunition inflicts only subdual damage. Further, if an attack with non-lethal ammunition suffers an error, an opponent may spend 2 action dice to cause the attack to inflict lethal damage instead. Finally, if the attack generates more than 10 points of damage, it gains the takedown quality.

Rock Salt: This ammunition is the traditional rural remedy for trespassers, replacing a shot shell's pellets with salt, creating minor but painful wounds. Within 10 ft., rock salt inflicts lethal damage, as well as 1d10 stress damage per successful hit. At any greater range, it inflicts subdual damage and 1d6 stress damage per successful hit.

Sabot, Bullets: This ammunition consists of a small, dense dart (the penetrator) surrounded by a lightweight jacket (the sabot). When the bullet is fired, the sabot falls away within a few dozen yards of the muzzle, leaving the penetrator to travel on at extreme-ly high velocity. Sabot ammunition grants the armor-piercing (10) quality to each attack made with it. If the attack already possesses the armor-piercing quality, this ammunition increases it by 5 (e.g. an attack with the armor-piercing (4) quality becomes an attack with the armor-piercing (9) quality).

Sabot, Shells: Unlike saboted bullets, which are designed for superior armor penetration, this ammunition increases a shotgun's range. This ammunition increases a shotgun's range increment by 50% (rounded up to the nearest 5 ft.).

Shot: This ammunition consists of multiple lead balls fired simultaneously from a single shell. When a character makes an attack with shot ammunition, any dodge bonuses and defense bonuses his target gains from Size are each decreased to 1/2 standard (rounded down).

Slug: This ammunition consists of a single massive cylinder of lead with no finesse or subtlety.

Smoke: This ammunition is used for concealment and signaling, releasing smoke with a blast increment listed in its qualities listing (see Gas Spread and Dispersal, page 346).

Standard: This ammunition is standard for its type, applying no special rules to attacks made with it.

Tracer: This ammunition grants a +2 gear bonus with attack checks made as part of an Autofire action. However, all Notice or Search checks made to locate the shooter are automatically successful.

WP (White Phosphorus): This ammunition burns at approxi-mately 2,000° C and cannot be extinguished in the presence of oxygen. In addition to its damage, WP ammunition also operates like smoke ammunition of the same size.